Can Humans Reach Even Older Age?

Jan Vijg, Ph.D., comments on the findings of a new study about the maximum lifespan for humans. Dr. Vijg also discusses his own research and urges scientists to work on ways to improve quality of life and average lifespan. Dr. Vijg is professor and chair of genetics and the Lola and Saul Kramer Chair in Molecular Genetics at Einstein.


Your Body Acquires Trillions of New Mutations Every Day

While the DNA in human cells constantly accumulate new mutations, Jan Vijg, Ph.D., notes that evolution has built in numerous “safety nets” to prevent cancer from developing. Dr. Vijg is professor and chair of genetics and the Lola and Saul Kramer Chair in Molecular Genetics at Einstein.


The New York Times interviews Jan Vijg, Ph.D., about research on the first attempt to reverse aging by partially reprogramming the genome in mice. Dr. Vijg is professor and chair of genetics, the Lola and Saul Kramer Chair in Molecular Genetics, and professor of ophthalmology & visual sciences at Einstein.


NPR features research led by Jan Vijg, Ph.D., which found that the maximum human lifespan is 115 years. Dr. Vijg is professor and chair of genetics and the Lola and Saul Kramer Chair in Molecular Genetics at Einstein.

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Newsweek interviews Jan Vijg, Ph.D., about a new “fasting” diet that may provide the benefits of calorie restriction, which decreases age-related disease and inflammation. The diet may sound gimmicky, but Dr. Vijg notes that the science backs up the claim that the plan could effectively improve human health and prolong life. Dr. Vijg is professor and chair of genetics and the Lola and Saul Kramer Chair in Molecular Genetics.


The New York Times interviews Jan Vijg, Ph.D., regarding a new study showing a specially designed drug that was developed to mimic high doses of resveratrol (a chemical compound found in red wine) substantially extended the average life span of obese mice. Dr. Vijg is professor and chair of genetics and the Lola and Saul Kramer Chair in Molecular Genetics.


The New York Times quotes Jan Vijg, Ph.D., in response to new research suggesting that the human life span could be extended. The article refers to a review authored by Dr. Vijg and Judith Campisi, Ph.D., of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, that appeared in Nature in August 2008. They argued that caloric restriction – which has been shown in some studies to extend the life span of laboratory mice – may be misleading. Dr. Vijg is chair of genetics and professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences at Einstein.


The New York Times features Dr. Jan Vijg, chairman, department of genetics, in an article exploring how resveratrol, found in red wine, can slow the aging process.


The Wall Street Journal interviews Dr. Nir Barzilai, director of Einstein's Institute for Aging, and Dr. Jan Vijg, professor and chair of genetics, in article entitled "Secrets of the Wellderly."