The Race for a Super-Antibody Against the Coronavirus

Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., describes the efforts of a multi-institutional collaboration he is leading to discover a potent, long-lasting antibody that would be effective against a range of coronaviruses, not only the one that causes COVID-19. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Scholar in Virology at Einstein.


A Man in Hong Kong is the First Confirmed Case of Coronavirus Reinfection

Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., discusses the case of a man who was reinfected with COVID-19 after he recovered from an initial bout of the disease. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Scholar in Virology at Einstein.


Blood from COVID-19 Survivors Might Point the Way to a Cure

Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., explains the process of developing monoclonal antibodies, synthetic antibodies that target a specific infection, and the race to create them to treat people with COVID-19. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology.


Antibodies from Ebola survivor could lead to treatments and vaccines

Research led by Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., found human antibodies that are effective against all major disease-causing ebolaviruses. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology.


Newsweek interviews Dr. Kartik Chandran about his Ebola research and discovery of human antibodies that are effective against all major disease-causing ebolaviruses. Dr. Chandran is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology.

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Wall Street Journal interviews Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., and Steven Walkley, D.V.M., Ph.D., about the connection between the rare genetic disease Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) and Ebola. Dr. Chandran’s research suggests that the gene mutation responsible for NPC may offer protection against Ebola. Dr. Walkley notes that it is well-known that carriers of certain genetic diseases might have protection against other diseases, citing that carriers for sickle-cell disease might be protected against malaria. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology and holds the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology. Dr. Walkley is director of the Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center and professor of pathology, of neurology and of neuroscience at Einstein. (subscription only)

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The New York Daily News interviews Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., about the evolving Ebola epidemic and the risk of airline travel in light of news that someone who later tested positive for the virus traveled by air while infected. Dr. Chandran notes that there has never been a case when a person caught Ebola on an airplane. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology and holds the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology.


New York Times interviews Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., about new research that found the experimental Ebola drug ZMapp was successful in treating monkeys infected with the virus. The drug was used to treat two American aid workers infected during the current West African outbreak. Dr. Chandran notes the preliminary results were astounding as following treatment all the monkeys were healthy. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology and holds the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology


CBSNews.com interviews Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., about the Ebola outbreak and his research on the virus. Dr. Chandran explains how Ebola enters cells and that his and other scientists’ research has identified new targets for drug development. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology and holds the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology.

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Huffington Post featured an op-ed co-written by Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., that addresses why no drug has been developed to cure Ebola. Dr. Chandran and co-author John Dye, Ph.D., of the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, note that industry might be hesitant to invest in research for a drug that treats a virus infecting a relatively small number of people. They also call for innovative academia-industry partnerships. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology and holds the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology.


The Science Channel’s “Through The Wormhole” interviews Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., about how the deadly Ebola virus infects humans. Dr. Chandran notes that viruses like Ebola have evolved to exploit access ways into cells, likening the behavior to using a lock pick to break into a padlock. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology and holds the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology.


National Geographic interviews Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., about the scientific possibility that a zombie-inducing virus, of the type featured in the film World War Z, could emerge in real life. Dr. Chandran provides some perspective on natural hybridization and spontaneous mutations that could lead to a novel and deadly virus spreading quickly, but notes that the majority of viruses on Earth actually infect single-celled microbes, not humans. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology.


The Scientist features Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., as a "Scientist to Watch" for his research that helped identify how the deadly Ebola virus infects cells. The article charts Dr. Chandran’s career – from his high school chemistry club’s explosive experiments to his innovative techniques to manipulate the surface proteins of viruses. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology.


Could the deadly Ebola virus establish a foothold in the U.S.? Newsweek.com talks to Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., about the possibility. Dr. Chandran recently received a $5 million NIH grant to investigate how Ebola is transmitted between animal species. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology.


The New York Times features research in Nature by Einstein's Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., and a multi-institutional team of researchers that identifies the key protein the deadly Ebola virus needs to infect cells, which could become a target for treatment. The research team includes investigators from Harvard Medical School and United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. Dr. Chandran is assistant professor of microbiology & immunology.