Better Options to Fight Debilitating Migraines On the Way

Richard Lipton, M.D., discusses his New England Journal of Medicine study on rimegepant, a drug belonging to a new generation of acute migraine headache treatments that was found to eliminate pain and reduce bothersome symptoms. Dr. Lipton is Edwin S. Lowe Professor and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the Montefiore Headache Center.

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CNN interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about a new study that finds moderate to intense exercise may slow the rate of mental decline. Dr. Lipton notes the study shows that low physical activity predicts cognitive decline, including the abilities that are important for everyday function such as processing speed and episodic memory. Dr. Lipton is director of the Einstein Aging Study and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center.


CBS News interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about his new research that finds stress doubles the chance of seniors developing a pre-Alzheimer’s condition. Along with Mindy Katz, M.P.H., the Einstein Aging Study team suggests that treating stress in the elderly may delay or even avoid the onset of dementia. Dr. Lipton is director of the Einstein Aging Study and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center. Ms. Katz is a senior associate in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology.

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The Washington Post interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about Einstein Aging Study (EAS) research presented at the 2015 Alzheimer’s Association conference. Among the eleven EAS oral and poster presentations, Dr. Lipton discusses two: one that indicates the incidence of dementia is declining and another that suggests psychological stress can elevate the risk of developing dementia. Dr. Lipton is director of the Einstein Aging Study and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center.


NBC News interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about a new class of drugs designed to prevent the onset of migraine. Dr. Lipton comments that these new medications have been shown to be remarkably effective and come with few side effects, based on a Phase II trial. Dr. Lipton is director of the Montefiore Headache Center, vice chair of Neurology at Einstein and Montefiore and holds the Edwin S. Lowe Chair in Neurology at Einstein.


The Washington Post interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., on the warning signs of dementia. Dr. Lipton notes that when it comes to memory lapses, retrieval problems are of less concern than storage problems. For example, forgetting the name of someone you just met is normal, but forgetting the person entirely may be a warning sign of something more serious. Dr. Lipton is director of the Einstein Aging Study and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center.


The Washington Post interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about a promising multi-drug approach to treating Alzheimer’s diseases. Dr. Lipton notes that combining therapies, rather than relying on a single drug, tends to be more effective, but cautions that this new treatment has yet to be tested in humans. Dr. Lipton is director of the Einstein Aging Study and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center.


The Washington Post interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about why more women than men develop Alzheimer’s disease. Research from Dr. Lipton’s Einstein Aging Study found that women, ages 70 to 79, were more than twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia as men of the same age, but that after the age of 80 the risk is similar for both genders. Dr. Lipton is director of the Einstein Aging Study and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center.


The New York Times interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about research from the Einstein Aging Study (EAS) which found an association between perceived stress and dementia. As part of two separate EAS studies, participants were surveyed about perceived stress. For healthy participants, cognitive loss was associated with scoring highest for stress and anxiety over a four-year period while the risk of dementia was two-and-a-half times greater for participants who had amnestic mild cognitive impairment and the highest perceived stress. Dr. Lipton is director of the Einstein Aging Study and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the division of cognitive aging and dementia at Montefiore Medical Center.


Bloomberg features new research by Richard Lipton, M.D., and Mindy Katz, M.P.H., finding early memory loss doubles the risk of dying. Ms. Katz notes the importance of detecting early Alzheimer’s symptoms since it may help reduce the risks of illness that lead to premature death. Dr. Lipton is professor and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center and director of the Einstein Aging Study. Ms. Katz is senior associate in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and Montefiore.

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U.S. News & World Report (via HealthDay) interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., on a new study linking migraine to depression in women. Dr. Lipton notes the large number of participants and the length of time they were followed make the findings important, but identifies some drawbacks of the study, including that it didn’t include women under 45 and that the depression was self-reported. Dr. Lipton is vice chair of neurology at Einstein and director of Montefiore’s Headache Center.


Time interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about a new study that links eating baked or broiled fish one or more times a week with a lowered risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Lipton notes that the there may be other factors associated with fish consumption – like more exercise or lower calorie intake – that researchers did not take into account. Dr. Lipton is professor and vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology, the Lotti and Bernard Benson Faculty Scholar in Alzheimer's Disease and director of the Einstein Aging Study.

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AARP.com interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about a new study finding that the more minor health problems a person develops not traditionally associated with brain health – such as loose dentures, sinus congestion and arthritis – the more likely they are to develop Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Lipton is vice chair and professor of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology, the Lotti and Bernard Benson Faculty Scholar in Alzheimer's Disease and director of the Einstein Aging Study.


The Wall Street Journal interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about the causes of and treatments for tension-type headaches. He notes that people who are depressed have increased rates of headaches, and people who have frequent headaches often become depressed. Dr. Lipton is vice chair of the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the Montefiore Headache Center.


ABC News interviews Richard Lipton, M.D., about a new study that demonstrates multilingual individuals are significantly more likely to avoid cognitive problems late in life than those who speak only two languages. Dr. Lipton notes that this study reinforces the "use it or lose it model of cognitive function" that has been gaining ground in recent years. His own work has shown that activities such as chess, bridge and doing crossword puzzles appeared to protect against Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Lipton cautions that all of these studies show an association between mental activity and staving off dementia, but they do not demonstrate causality. Dr. Lipton is vice chair and professor of The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology, the Lotti and Bernard Benson Faculty Scholar in Alzheimer's Disease and director of the Einstein Aging Study.

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