Some Parents Are Feeding Parasites to Their Kids With Autism

Eric Hollander, M.D., comments on how ingesting the eggs of the parasitic worm Trichuris suis may affect the gut microbiome and improve repetitive behavior, rigidity, and irritability in people with autism spectrum disorder. Dr. Hollander is professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Einstein and director of the Autism and Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Program at Einstein and Montefiore.


Experimental Autism Drugs Aim to Improve Social Communication Skills

Eric Hollander, M.D., comments on the results of two clinical trials, one of which he led, that found hormone-altering drugs seemed to improve social communication in patients with autism. Dr. Hollander is professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Einstein and director of the Autism and Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Program at Einstein and Montefiore.


After Other Options Fail, A Family Tries Medical Marijuana For Son With Autism

Eric Hollander, M.D., is conducting the first large clinical study in the United States to test the effectiveness of medical marijuana on certain behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorder. Dr. Hollander is professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Einstein and director of the Autism and Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Program at Einstein and Montefiore.


The Atlantic interviews Eric Hollander, M.D., on a new study suggesting a link between autism and addiction. Dr. Hollander is a clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Einstein and director of the Autism and Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Program at Montefiore Health System and Einstein.


Einstein and Montefiore research using the parasitic whipworm to treat autism is highlighted in a New York Times op-ed. The clinical trial, lead by Eric Hollander, M.D., is based on indications that immune dysregulation may be at the root of some cases of autism. Dr. Hollander is clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Einstein and the director of the Autism and Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Program at Montefiore Medical Center.


The New York Times interviews Eric Hollander, M.D., about “mirror fasts,” abstaining from looking at your reflection to get in touch with yourself. While some admit to using the mirror as a life raft – confirming they are “ok” when going through a difficult time – Dr. Hollander observes that some get stuck in front of the mirror picking at their imperfections. Dr. Hollander is clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Einstein and the director of the Autism and Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Program at Montefiore Medical Center.


The Wall Street Journal interviews Eric Hollander, M.D., about his upcoming clinical trial using the eggs of the pig whipworm parasite, which doesn’t naturally infect or reproduce in humans, to treat the more severe symptoms of autism. Whipworm treatments, which are based on the theory that people in developed countries are no longer exposed to enough “good” microorganisms, have been shown to alleviate the symptoms of autoimmune diseases like Crohn’s disease and, in at least one case, autism. Dr. Hollander is clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Einstein and the director of the Compulsive, Impulsive and Autism Spectrum Disorder Program at Montefiore Medical Center.


The Scientist features Eric Hollander, M.D., and his collaboration with one of his patient's parents to use a pig whipworm to treat the violent behavioral problems associated with his patient's autism. The parent, Steward Johnson, found a study out of the University of Iowa that showed Trichuris suis, a parasite found in the intestines of pigs, successfully treated autoimmune disorders. He also found evidence that autism symptoms were the apparent result of the immune system attacking specific brain cells. Putting the two together, Mr. Johnson convinced Dr. Hollander to look into and eventually try the treatment — which has proven successful in curbing the patient's worst behaviors. Dr. Hollander is clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and the director of the Compulsive, Impulsive and Autism Spectrum Disorder Program.