Einstein/Montefiore Department of Medicine

In The Media

The New York Times interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about his upcoming clinical trial to determine if an existing FDA-approved drug can extend health span. Dr. Barzilai and his collaborators at the American Federation for Aging Research will investigate if metformin, a cheap and commonly used medication to treat type 2 diabetes, can delay the onset of several age-related diseases. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein.

(Monday, February 01, 2016)

Dr. Barzilai's Profile
 
 

National Geographic highlights the leadership role Nir Barzilai, M.D., is taking in a clinical trial to determine if a common diabetes drug can delay aging. Dr. Barzilai notes that the goal of the Targeting Aging with Metformin (TAME) study is not to find the “fountain of youth,” but to extend the number of healthy, active years humans can enjoy. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein.

(Thursday, December 03, 2015)

Dr. Barzilai's Profile
 
 

The New York Times interviews John Greally, M.B.B.S., Ph.D., about a new study that suggests a father’s experiences may influence the biology of his offspring. Dr. Greally notes the study size was small and therefore not conclusive. However, he suggests that research involving hundreds of subjects may help pin down whether epigenomic factors, namely molecules that turn genes on and off, can be passed down to children. Dr. Greally is professor of genetics, of medicine and of pediatrics and the director of the center for epigenomics at Einstein and attending physician at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore.

(Thursday, December 03, 2015)

Dr. Greally's Profile
 
 

New York Times interviews Michael Alderman, M.D., about research that found reducing systolic blood pressure below current guidelines can save lives. The study determined that participants whose blood pressure was kept below 120, rather than the current recommended target of 140, had a 25 percent reduction in heart attack, heart failure or stroke, or died from heart disease. This was primarily achieved by providing additional medications. Dr. Alderman urged caution, noting decades-long pill taking by generally healthy people may lead to unintended consequences. Dr. Alderman is distinguished university professor emeritus of epidemiology & population health and of medicine.

(Monday, November 09, 2015)

Dr. Alderman's Profile
 
 

New York Times interviews Kami Kim, M.D., about her research that indicates children with HIV are more likely to develop a severe form of malaria and die. Dr. Kim’s study looked at 3,000 Malawian children who went into comas with cerebral malaria and included autopsies on more than 100 who had died. Dr. Kim is professor of medicine, of microbiology & immunology and of pathology at Einstein and attending physician, infectious disease at Montefiore.

(Tuesday, September 29, 2015)

Dr. Kim's Profile
 
 

The Wall Street Journal reports on a landmark breast cancer study led by Joseph Sparano, M.D. Their research validates a genomic test, which allows many women with early-stage disease to safely skip chemotherapy. Dr. Sparano is vice chairman of medical oncology at Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care, professor of medicine and of obstetrics and gynecology & women's health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and associate director of clinical research at the NCI-designated Albert Einstein Cancer Center.

(Monday, September 28, 2015)

Dr. Sparano's Profile
 
 

New York Times interviews Michael Alderman, M.D., about a new study that will likely change clinical guidelines and goals for blood pressure. The study found that those who got their systolic blood pressure below 120 had a markedly lower death rate and fewer heart attacks and strokes than those whose goal was a blood pressure below 140. Dr. Alderman notes that this is the first study that has shown reducing systolic pressure to below 140 was safe, let alone beneficial. Dr. Alderman is distinguished university professor emeritus of epidemiology & population health and of medicine.

(Friday, September 18, 2015)

Dr. Alderman's Profile
 
 

Forbes interviews Matthew Robbins, M.D., about his research that finds headache during pregnancy may indicate complications, including preeclampsia. Dr. Robbins notes that because many symptoms of migraine overlap with those of preeclampsia, including nausea, vomiting and visual change, it is important for pregnant women to follow up regularly with their provider if experiencing any of these symptoms. Dr. Robbins is associate professor of clinical neurology at Einstein and director of inpatient services at Montefiore Headache Center.

(Thursday, August 20, 2015)

Dr. Robbins' Profile
 
 

Scientific American interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about latest research advances for slowing or delaying the aging process in humans. Dr. Barzilai, who conducts longevity research with centenarians, notes his “superagers” tend to have a significant delay in the onset of age-related diseases and stay healthier longer. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein and attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Wednesday, July 01, 2015)

Dr. Barzilai's Profile
 
 

The Scientist interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., and Evris Gavathiotis, Ph.D., about their success in pursuing private funding in the face of federal funding cuts. Drs. Barzilai and Gavathiotis share how they identified and pursued alternative funding sources and how it has helped advance their research.  Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein and attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center. Dr. Gavathiotis is assistant professor of biochemistry and of medicine.

(Friday, May 01, 2015)

Dr. Barzilai's Profile | Dr. Gavathiotis' Profile
 
 

The Scientist interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., and Evris Gavathiotis, Ph.D., about their success in pursuing private funding in the face of federal funding cuts. Drs. Barzilai and Gavathiotis share how they identified and pursued alternative funding sources and how it has helped advance their research.  Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein and attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center. Dr. Gavathiotis is assistant professor of biochemistry and of medicine.

(Friday, May 01, 2015)

Dr. Barzilai's Profile | Dr. Gavathiotis' Profile
 
 

The Scientist interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., and Evris Gavathiotis, Ph.D., about their success in pursuing private funding in the face of federal funding cuts. Drs. Barzilai and Gavathiotis share how they identified and pursued alternative funding sources and how it has helped advance their research.  Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein and attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center. Dr. Gavathiotis is assistant professor of biochemistry and of medicine.

(Friday, May 01, 2015)

Dr. Barzilai's Profile | Dr. Gavathiotis' Profile
 
 

The New York Times features John Greally, M.B.B.Ch., Ph.D., and the artist who works with Einstein’s genetic researchers to help visualize “big data.” Dr. Greally explains that large biological data sets are relegated to the digital realm and it is difficult for researchers to develop an instinct for what’s important. Dr. Greally is professor of genetics, of medicine and of pediatrics and director of the center for epigenomics at Einstein and attending physician at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore.

(Friday, March 27, 2015)

Dr. Greally's Profile
 
 

The New York Times references Einstein’s centenarian studies and Nir Barzilai, M.D., in an obituary on 109-year old Irving Kahn. Kahn, considered the oldest active Wall Street investor before his death, was a participant in Dr. Barzilai’s studies at Einstein’s Institute of Aging Research. He was also profiled as part of Einstein’s Longevity Genes Project video series. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein and attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Friday, February 27, 2015)

Dr. Barzilai's Profile
 
 

Bloomberg News interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about Novartis’ efforts to develop FDA-approved drug rapamycin as an anti-aging, preventative therapy. It was long believed that rapamycin suppressed the immune response, rendering it unsuitable for long-term use in older adults. However, Dr. Barzilai notes that a recent “watershed” moment occurred when new research found it merely modulated the immune response in humans, clearing the way for more research. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein and attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Thursday, February 12, 2015)

Dr. Barzilai's Profile
 
 
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