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Einstein in the Media

Wall Street Journal ran an op-ed co-written by Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., that supports turning the National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant process into a lottery. Dr. Casadevall and co-author Ferric Fang, M.D., of the University of Washington, cite research that highlights problems with the current peer review grant process, including bias influencing funding decisions. They suggest that a lottery would make the process more transparent and alleviate stress on scarce resources. Views expressed in the op-ed, available only via subscription, represent those of Drs. Casadevall and Fang and not Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein.

(Thursday, April 17, 2014)

 

The Atlantic features research by Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., that suggests an easy way to help increase the number of female speakers at conferences. Dr. Casadevall’s study found having at least one woman on the organizing committee of a meeting increased the proportion of female speakers by 72 percent compared with those convened by men alone. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology and director of the Center for Immunological Sciences at Einstein.

(Tuesday, January 07, 2014)

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The Washington Post interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about the mass killings of amphibians, and possibly honeybees, from fungal infections. Dr. Casadevall notes that the field of fungal research is small, underfunded and often overlooked relative to its importance in the environment. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein.

(Monday, September 16, 2013)

 

Seattle Times ran an op-ed co-written by Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., that decries the rise in cheating in science and its profound consequences. Along with co-author Ferric Fang, M.D., of the University of Washington, Dr. Casadevall explains their recent findings that scientific misconduct involves all levels of the scientific workforce, from faculty members to technicians, and that male scientists are more likely to be sanctioned for cheating than their female counterparts. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein.

(Friday, March 22, 2013)

 

Los Angeles Times interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about his new research that found 65 percent of scientific misconduct cases were perpetrated by men. Dr. Casadevall suggested expanding ethics training to senior faculty, instituting more effective mentoring programs and independent agency oversight might help reduce the serious problem of scientific misconduct. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein.

(Wednesday, January 23, 2013)

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Associated Press interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about the fungus causing the current meningitis outbreak, which is very hard to diagnose and treat. Dr. Casadevall notes that scientists are not familiar with this particular fungal infection which until now had only caused 33 human infections, mostly in the eye or skin of people with weak immune systems. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein.

(Friday, October 26, 2012)

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The New York Times interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) study he co-authored that found misconduct, not errors, is the cause of most retractions. The PNAS paper showed that in the last 35 years retractions for fraud or suspected fraud have increased 10-fold. Dr. Casadevall believes that unless the scientific community changes its "winner-take-all" culture, the rise in retractions will continue. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein.

(Wednesday, October 03, 2012)

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Science interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about the surprising decision by PLoS Pathogens to retract a study before discussing it with the authors. While a portion of the retracted 2006 study is still valid – identifying for the first time XMVR, the virus that has become notorious for its now-refuted link to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome – some of its other findings have been proven wrong, most notably those linking the virus to prostate cancer. Dr. Casadevall noted that it was unusual for a journal to issue a retraction without discussing it with the authors ahead of time. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology at Einstein.

(Friday, September 21, 2012)

 

Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., questions the individual and societal benefits of the intense competition among scientists in a Scientific American editorial. The "priority rule," which gives credit for a discovery to the first scientist who reports it, is a significant driver of this competition and Dr. Casadevall and his co-author Ferric Fang, M.D., argue that it may have outlived its usefulness in an era of complexity and collaboration. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology at Einstein.

(Wednesday, July 25, 2012)

 

In a Huffington Post editorial stressing the rise in retracted scientific papers, Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., suggests drastic changes to scientific culture. Along with co-author Ferric Fang, M.D., of the University of Washington, Dr. Casadevall points to the “winner-take-all” reward system and the decline in federal funding as major causes for concern. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology at Einstein.

(Wednesday, May 30, 2012)

 

Nature interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about his role in approving the publication of research on engineered H5N1 flu viruses deadly to humans. Dr. Casadevall is a member of the U.S. National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity, which ultimately voted to allow two papers detailing the creation of the viruses to be published. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and holds the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology.

(Wednesday, May 23, 2012)

 

The New York Times interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about two editorials he co-wrote that expose the recent increase in retracted scientific papers and call for a fundamental shift in the scientific culture and funding systems that he believes are behind the trend. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology at Einstein.

(Wednesday, April 18, 2012)

 

Nature interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about the mysterious Kawasaki disease, a sometimes fatal illness that strikes young children and possibly travels to Japan and the U.S. on wind currents. Rates of reported cases of the disease, whose cause is still unknown, correlate to the rise and fall of northwest winds in Japan. Dr. Casadevall notes the circumstantial evidence for wind-borne Kawasaki disease is strong, but emphasizes that correlation is not causation. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology and immunology at Einstein.

(Friday, April 06, 2012)

 

The New York Times (Science Times) interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about whether amateur biologists are capable of engineering the deadly, mutant version of the H5N1 flu virus created by professional scientists. While there are safeguards in place to prevent it, Dr. Casadevall notes that human ingenuity shouldn’t be underestimated and a determined actor could succeed. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of immunology & microbiology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein. (Tuesday, March 06, 2012)

 

The Guardian features Dr. Arturo Casadevall’s participation on a panel of leading virus experts who discussed permanent restrictions on research in light of the new genetically engineered H5N1 flu virus that could kill half the world’s population if released. Dr. Casadevall is a member of the U.S. National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity, which in December asked the journals Science and Nature not to publish the full research on the virus. He said that he was initially opposed to the restrictions, but has been persuaded they were necessary. Dr. Casadevall, who holds both an M.D. and a Ph.D. degree, is professor and Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein. (Friday, February 03, 2012)

 

NPR's Morning Edition interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about the restrictions placed on scientists who study dangerous microbes. The topic is in the news because the World Health Organization may soon require the destruction of the last known laboratory samples of smallpox, whose last natural infection occurred more than 30 years ago. Dr. Casadevall surveyed U.S. microbiologists about the number of microbes they have had to destroy in response to government rules put in place following the September 11, 2001 attacks. He notes that physicians and researchers are often forced to destroy their samples because the mechanisms to transfer the microbes to legally approved sites are too complex. Dr. Casadevall is professor and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology and Immunology. (Thursday, January 20, 2011)

 

Discover.com highlights a mathematical model developed by Aviv Bergman, Ph.D., and Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., to support Dr. Casadevall's theory that warm-blooded mammals evolved to defend against fungal infections. The model shows that the optimum body temperature for organisms to ward off fungal infections without burning too much energy is in the 98-degree Fahrenheit range. Dr. Bergman is professor and founding chair of systems and computational biology. Dr. Casadevall is professor of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology and Immunology. (Wednesday, December 29, 2010)

 

Science News interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about his new research, developed with Aviv Bergman, Ph.D., which provides a mathematical model to support Dr. Casadevall's theory that warm-blooded mammals evolved to defend against fungal infections. The novel model shows that the optimum body temperature for organisms to ward off fungal infections without burning too much energy is 36.7° Celsius, which is close to the core body temperatures of mammals, including humans. Dr. Casadevall is professor and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology and Immunology. Dr. Bergman is professor and founding chair of systems and computational biology. (Tuesday, December 07, 2010)

 

BBC News interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., on his assertion that the U.S. Select Agents and Toxins List restrictions are too rigorous, preventing vital work on vaccines. Dr. Casadevall and Stanford's David Relman argue in a paper in Nature Reviews Microbiology that the regulations should be relaxed and list reduced to ensure that the medical research community is positioned to quickly address natural outbreaks of toxins on the list. Dr. Casadevall is the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology. (Segment begins at 14:45 on BBC player) (Tuesday, January 26, 2010)

 

NPR's "Science Friday" includes Dr. Arturo Casadevall, Forchheimer professor and chair of microbiology & immunology at Einstein, on a panel of nationally acclaimed scientists to discuss the many facets of fungi. (Friday, September 12, 2008) hear audio...
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