Media More Coverage

Einstein in the Media

National Geographic interviews Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., about the scientific possibility that a zombie-inducing virus, of the type featured in the film World War Z, could emerge in real life. Dr. Chandran provides some perspective on natural hybridization and spontaneous mutations that could lead to a novel and deadly virus spreading quickly, but notes that the majority of viruses on Earth actually infect single-celled microbes, not humans. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology.

(Tuesday, June 25, 2013)

 

The Scientist features Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., as a "Scientist to Watch" for his research that helped identify how the deadly Ebola virus infects cells. The article charts Dr. Chandran’s career – from his high school chemistry club’s explosive experiments to his innovative techniques to manipulate the surface proteins of viruses. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology.

(Tuesday, September 04, 2012)

 

Could the deadly Ebola virus establish a foothold in the U.S.? Newsweek.com talks to Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., about the possibility. Dr. Chandran recently received a $5 million NIH grant to investigate how Ebola is transmitted between animal species. Dr. Chandran is associate professor of microbiology & immunology.

(Monday, August 06, 2012)

 

The New York Times features research in Nature by Einstein's Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., and a multi-institutional team of researchers that identifies the key protein the deadly Ebola virus needs to infect cells, which could become a target for treatment. The research team includes investigators from Harvard Medical School and United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. Dr. Chandran is assistant professor of microbiology & immunology. (Tuesday, January 17, 2012)

 

Reuters features new research by Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., published in Nature that identifies the key used by the deadly Ebola virus to unlock and infect cells. Dr. Chandran is assistant professor of microbiology & immunology. (Wednesday, August 24, 2011)

More coverage on this story

Science News
Voice of American
ThirdAge.com
Europa Press (Spain)
The Guardian (U.K.)
New York Daily News
The Johns Hopkins News-Letter

More coverage on other stories