Media More Coverage

Einstein in the Media

Time features research led by Sophie Molholm, Ph.D., suggesting that brain scans measuring how quickly children process sensory information could be used to diagnose autism. The study found the degree to which a child abnormally processed sights and sounds was directly correlated to the severity of autism symptoms. Dr. Molholm is associate professor in the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience and of pediatrics and the Muriel and Harold Block Faculty Scholar in Mental Illness.

(Monday, September 22, 2014)

More coverage on this story

Washington Post
New York
U.S. News & World Report
Popular Science

 

NPR’s All Things Considered interviews Sophie Molholm, Ph.D., about her research that uses EEG to demonstrate children with autism take longer to integrate incoming visual and auditory information than typically developing children. Dr. Molholm notes that as children with autism become teenagers they become better at sensory integration, which suggests if they are diagnosed early they can start therapy to encourage the practice of integrating different stimuli. Dr. Molholm is associate professor in the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience and of pediatrics and the Muriel and Harold Block Faculty Scholar in Mental Illness. (Friday, June 03, 2011)

 

ScientificAmerican.com features a recent study by Sophie Molholm, Ph.D. which provides evidence that children with autism spectrum disorders are slower to integrate input that requires multiple senses to process than typically developing children. The research — which appears in the August 19 online edition of Autism Research — used EEG to measure electrical activity in the brain as subjects encountered various stimuli. The findings could lead to objective measures for evaluating the effectiveness of autism therapies for children and families. Dr. Molholm is associate professor in the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience and of pediatrics. (Monday, August 23, 2010)

More coverage on this story

Babble.com

More coverage on other stories