Einstein in the Media | U.S./Global

NY1 interviews Jonathan Lai, Ph.D., about his research on Ebola that focuses on developing antibodies to use as a possible treatment for all five strains of the virus. Dr. Lai notes that so far his lab has discovered antibodies that have proven protective in mice against the Sudan strain of the Ebola virus, but more research is required. Dr. Lai is associate professor of biochemistry. (Tuesday, August 19, 2014)

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USA Today interviews Belinda Ostrowsky, M.D., about rapid detection tests for Ebola that are in development. The fastest reliable tests for Ebola currently take about three days, which can delay treatment. Dr. Ostrowsky notes that any rapid detection method would benefit patients and healthcare providers. Dr. Ostrowsky is associate professor of clinical medicine at Einstein and director of the Einstein-Montefiore Antibiotic Stewardship Program. (Friday, August 15, 2014)

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NPR’s Morning Edition interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., on the controversy surrounding research on dangerous lab-made pathogens. Following the mishandling of smallpox by the CDC, the potential exposure of CDC scientists to live anthrax and even the recent the spread of Ebola, biologists and others are calling on the National Academy of Sciences to provide guidance on when and under what conditions research using lab-manipulated pathogens should be allowed to move forward. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein. (Dr. Casadevall’s interview begins at 4:38 in the audio version) (Wednesday, August 13, 2014)

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The Washington Post reports on research by Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., that predicts pre-dementia by measuring walking speed and cognitive abilities. The quick, low-tech test determined that 1 in 10 older adults have pre-dementia. The study involved 27,000 people in 7 countries. It found that those who had unusually slow walking speed and cognitive complaints are twice as likely to develop dementia within 12 years. Dr. Verghese is professor of neurology at Einstein and chief of the division of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center. (Tuesday, August 05, 2014)

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ABC-TV’s Good Morning America interviews Keith Ayoob, Ed.D., about a new CDC report that found nearly 25 percent of parents underestimate their children’s weight. The study also found that 27 percent of children and teens underestimate their own weight. Dr. Ayoob notes parents often believe that their children will outgrow being overweight, which is unlikely, and cautions against waiting to make dietary and lifestyle changes. Dr. Ayoob is associate clinical professor of pediatrics and director of the nutrition clinic at the Children's Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center at Einstein. (Friday, August 01, 2014)

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The Washington Post interviews Solomon Moshé, M.D., about the case of a girl with a rare form of epilepsy that causes uncontrolled bouts of laughter. Dr. Moshe notes that these gelastic seizures aren’t sparked by happiness and can actually be quite scary for the patient. Dr. Moshé is director of the division of pediatric neurology and professor in The Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology and The Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience at Einstein as well as chief of pediatric neurology at The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore. (Tuesday, June 24, 2014)

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New York Daily News interviews John Greally, M.B., B.Ch., Ph.D., about his study that found environmental influences may play a role in the development of autism. Dr. Greally identified epigenetic changes, which can control which genes are turned on or off, that may be implicated. Dr. Greally is professor of genetics, of medicine and of pediatrics, director of the Center for Epigenomics and the Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Faculty Scholar for Epigenomics at Einstein and attending physician, pediatrics at The Children's Hospital at Montefiore. (Monday, June 02, 2014)

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The New York Times Magazine quotes Paul Frenette, M.D., in an article on research linking the nervous system to inflammation. Dr. Frenette has discovered that nerves play a key role in triggering prostate cancer, which is also associated with inflammation. Dr. Frenette is professor of medicine and of cell biology and director of the Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research. (Tuesday, May 27, 2014)

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New York Post covered Einstein’s Spirit of Achievement luncheon at the Plaza Hotel, which honored actor Christine Baranski (“The Good Wife”). Other honorees included Judy Aschner, M.D., Michael I. Cohen, M.D., University Chair of Pediatrics at Einstein and Montefiore (pictured), beauté’s Julie Macklowe and Gilt’s Alexandra Wilkis Wilson. Proceeds from the annual event benefit research in women’s and men’s cancers—including ovarian, lung, colon, prostate, cervical, uterine, pancreatic, breast cancer and leukemia. The event was hosted by the New York Chapter of the National Women’s Division. (Friday, May 16, 2014)

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The Washington Post interviews John Foxe, Ph.D., about his research with children who have difficulty processing sensory information, like sound and touch. Dr. Foxe's research, conducted with his collaborator Sophie Molholm, Ph.D., has shown that the brain wave patterns of children identified with having sensory processing disorder differ from those of typically developing children. Dr. Foxe is professor in the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience and of pediatrics, and director of research at the Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center at Einstein. (Tuesday, May 13, 2014)

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AAMC Reporter interviews John-Paul Sánchez, M.D., regarding changes in the Affordable Care Act that could help reduce health disparities for LGBT patients. Dr. Sánchez notes that additional training among physicians on providing care to the LGBT community is necessary. He also points out that many doctors may not realize that LGBT individuals who are minorities may face increased discrimination that in turn compromises their health. Dr. Sánchez is assistant professor of emergency medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. (Friday, May 02, 2014)

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The Washington Post interviews Brian Currie, M.D., M.P.H., about a new medical research data-sharing network to house the records of nearly 30 million Americans. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s network will make it easier to identify patients who could be invited to join clinical trials and conduct comparative effectiveness and clinical outcomes research. Dr. Currie is professor of clinical medicine and of clinical epidemiology & population health at Einstein and assistant dean for clinical research at Montefiore Medical Center. (Friday, April 18, 2014)

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CBSNews.com interviews Joel Zonszein, M.D., about a new report that found diabetes-related health complications have declined, including stroke. Dr. Zonszein notes that new medications and increasing educational programs that tackle smoking cessation and nutrition help prevent some diabetes-related complications. Dr. Zonszein is professor of clinical medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center. (Friday, April 18, 2014)

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New York Times interviews Geoffrey Kabat, Ph.D., about the usefulness of Body Mass Index (BMI) for measuring weight and obesity. Dr. Kabat notes that BMI actually misses more than half of people with excess body fat. Dr. Kabat is a senior epidemiologist at Einstein. (Monday, April 14, 2014)

 
 

How much dietary salt is necessary? NBC’s “The Today Show” features research by Michael Alderman, M.D., that found current salt guidelines may be too low for most Americans. The collaborative study by Dr. Alderman and researchers at the Copenhagen University Hospital found that the average daily sodium intake of most Americans (between around 2,600 milligrams to 5,000 milligrams daily) is actually associated with better health outcomes than many current recommended guidelines (below 2,300 mg/day). Dr. Alderman is distinguished university professor emeritus of epidemiology & population health and of medicine, and holds the Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine. (Wednesday, April 02, 2014)

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