Einstein in the News | U.S./Global

New York Times reports on research by Erika Levi, M.D., that finds women who want to receive an IUD after a cesarean section should no longer be urged to wait. Currently, women who have cesareans are told to return to their doctors for IUDs 6 weeks after giving birth, after half of them have resumed sexual relations. Dr. Levi is professor of obstetrics & gynecology and women’s health at Einstein and attending physician at Montefiore Health System.  (Tuesday, June 09, 2015)

Dr. Levi's Profile

 
 

The Huffington Post published a letter by Sean Lucan, M.D., M.P.H., urging parents and schools to work to get healthy foods and healthy-food education into schools. Dr. Lucan argues that unhealthy options – such as candy and juice – should be removed, with healthy foods – such as trail mix and whole fruit mashed and frozen into popsicles –encouraged and made available instead. Dr. Lucan is assistant professor of family and social medicine at Einstein and attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center. (Friday, May 29, 2015)

More coverage on Dr. Lucan | Dr. Lucan's Profile

 
 

NPR’s The Takeaway interviews Tia Powell, M.D., about the bioethical questions raised by Alzheimer’s patients being sexually active in institutional settings. A recent court case involving a husband and his impaired wife has focused attention on this issue. Dr. Powell discusses issues of privacy, our cultural bias and presumptions, and the lack of consensus around this taboo topic. Dr. Powell is director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for Bioethics and the Einstein-Cardozo Master of Science in Bioethics program. (Friday, April 24, 2015)

More coverage on Dr. Powell | Dr. Powell's Profile

 
 

Science News interviews Betsy Herold, M.D., about her new research with William Jacobs, Jr., Ph.D., on an experimental herpes vaccine. Dr. Herold explains that their novel approach was to silence the loud, or dominant, surface protein on the virus in order to use the other proteins to trigger an effective immune response. Dr. Herold holds the Harold and Muriel Block Chair in Pediatrics at Einstein and is the chief of the division of pediatric infectious diseases at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore and Einstein. Dr. Jacobs is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein. (Tuesday, March 10, 2015)

More coverage on Dr. Jacobs, Jr. | Dr. Herold's Profile | Dr. Jacobs' Profile

 
 

USA Today interviews Dr. David Rosenstreich about research that finds poverty and poor living conditions are the causes of high rates of asthma – whether in cities or suburbs. As the concentration of poverty has increased in suburbs and rural areas, so have the rates of asthma in those areas. Dr. Rosenstreich points out that the asthma rates are vastly different in Harlem compared to the Upper West Side of Manhattan, although the two neighborhoods are next to each other. This reinforces that it is low socioeconomic status and associated poor living conditions that leads to asthma. Dr. Rosenstreich is professor and director of the division of allergy and immunology in the department of medicine at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center and the Joseph and Sadie Danciger Distinguished Scholar in Microbiology/Immunology at Einstein. (Tuesday, January 20, 2015)

More coverage on Dr. Rosenstreich | Dr. Rosenstreich's Profile

 
 

The Scientist interviews Vladislav Verkhusha, Ph.D., about in vivo imaging techniques researchers can use to monitor and track infection in small mammals. Dr. Verkhusha has developed a variety of fluorescent proteins for imaging use. Dr. Verkhusha is professor of anatomy and structural biology. (Wednesday, January 07, 2015)

More coverage on Dr. Verkhusha | Dr. Verkhusha's Profile

 
 

What’s a question your doctor should be asking you according to a Time interview with Peter Selwyn, M.D., M.P.H., and Einstein medical student Ross Kristal? Their study, which found a correlation between soda consumption and health problems, suggests that asking how much soda a patient drinks should be included when taking a patient’s history. Kristal, a fourth year medical student, notes that information about overall diet and physical activity are vital in preventing and managing certain diseases but is rarely captured, which is why the question is standard at Montefiore Medical Center, the University Hospital for Einstein. Dr. Selwyn is chair of family and social medicine at Einstein and Montefiore. (Tuesday, December 30, 2014)

Dr. Selwyn's Profile

 
 

Scientific American interviews Dr. Peter Satir about the connection between cilia, hairlike structures on cells, and genetic disorders, such as blindness or kidney disease. Dr. Satir notes that primary cilia serve as a signaling system during embryonic development, but when that pathway is disrupted due to deformed cilia, genetic disorders, can occur. Dr. Satir is distinguished university professor of anatomy and structural biology. (Tuesday, December 23, 2014)

Dr. Satir's Profile

 
 

New York Times interviews Einstein medical student, Joseph Gotesman, and Michael Reichgott, M.D., Ph.D., about VetConnect, an organization to help homeless veterans. Since founding VetConnect to connect local, Bronx veterans to needed services, Mr. Gotesman’s grassroots initiative has helped several veterans get permanent housing and find employment. Mr. Gotesman, who is in his second-year at Einstein, is trying to expand the initiative to other states with high rates of homelessness among veterans. Dr. Reichgott is professor of medicine at Einstein. (Friday, November 14, 2014)

Dr. Reichgott's profile

 
 

WABC-TV interviews John Condeelis, M.D., about his imaging research that is helping to explain how cancer spreads from the primary tumor. Dr. Condeelis and his team found that normal immune cells, called macrophages, aid the tumor cells in cancer metastasis by directing the tumor cells toward blood vessels. By better understanding this process at the patient level, doctors can more accurately assess which patients need aggressive treatments and which patients can be spared those treatments. Dr. Condeelis is professor and co-chair of anatomy and structural biology and co-director of the Gruss Lipper Biophotonics Center, and the Judith and Burton P. Resnick Chair in Translational Research at Einstein. (Monday, October 06, 2014)

More coverage on Dr. Condeelis | Dr. Condeelis' Profile

 
 

The New York Times features new research by Elina Jerschow, M.D., that found medications are the cause of most fatal allergic reactions. Dr. Jerschow notes that antibiotics and radiocontrast agents used in imaging studies are the two top medicines responsible for allergic deaths. Dr. Jerschow is assistant professor of medicine at Einstein and director of the Drug Allergy Center at Montefiore Medical Center. (Monday, October 06, 2014)

More coverage on this story | More coverage on Dr. Jerschow | Dr. Jerschow's Profile

 
 

Wall Street Journal interviews Judy Wylie-Rosett, Ph.D., about research that suggests artificial sweeteners may raise blood sugar levels by altering the body’s gut bacteria. Dr. Wylie-Rosett notes that the study is important since it is the first to examine how gut microbes contribute to processing real and fake sugars. Dr. Wylie-Rosett is head of the division of health promotion and nutrition research, and professor of epidemiology & population health and of medicine at Einstein. (Thursday, September 18, 2014)

More coverage on Dr. Wylie-Rosett | Dr. Rosett's Profile

 
 

Nature interviews Dean Hosgood, Ph.D., M.P.H, about his research on the environmental and genetic factors that lead to high rates of lung cancer in non-smoking Asian women. Dr. Hosgood notes that as smoking decreases, other factors will become a larger proportion of lung cancer cases, so investigating this phenomenon can help the wider population. Dr. Hosgood is assistant professor of epidemiology & population health. (Monday, September 15, 2014)

Dr. Hosgood's Profile

 
 

CBSNews.com interviews Lisa Shulman, M.D., about a promising autism intervention program that helped resolve autism behaviors in the majority of 7-to-15-month-olds studied. Dr. Shulman calls the study “groundbreaking” and also outlines a few key behaviors parents should look out for, such as fixating for long periods on objects rather than faces. Dr. Shulman is associate professor of clinical pediatrics and director of infant and toddler services at Einstein’s Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center and an attending physician at The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore. (Tuesday, September 09, 2014)

More coverage on this story | More coverage on Dr. Shulman | Dr. Shulman's Profile

 
 

USA Today interviews Belinda Ostrowsky, M.D., about rapid detection tests for Ebola that are in development. The fastest reliable tests for Ebola currently take about three days, which can delay treatment. Dr. Ostrowsky notes that any rapid detection method would benefit patients and healthcare providers. Dr. Ostrowsky is associate professor of clinical medicine at Einstein and director of the Einstein-Montefiore Antibiotic Stewardship Program. (Friday, August 15, 2014)

Dr. Ostrowsky's Profile

 
 
First Page | Previous Page | Page of 14 | Next Page | Last Page