Registrar Office

Department of Family & Social Medicine (2014)

 

For general questions regarding electives in our department, please contact: 

Ms. Adriana Nieto, 718-430-2900, adriana.nieto@einstein.yu.edu 

For questions about a specific elective, please contact the elective director indicated below. 

 

STEPS FOR PROCURING A FAMILY MEDICINE ELECTIVE

Step One: Arrangement and Approval from the Course Director

All students MUST get initial approval from the official elective course director or contact person (listed under each course below).  

Before contacting the course director, please note the following policies:
 

Eligibility
All students attending a medical school outside of the US, or from a medical school which is not LCME-accredited, MUST contact the Einstein Office of the Registrar at  registrar@einstein.yu.edu or 718-430-2102.
 

Availability
Rotations may occasionally be unavailable due to conflicting faculty responsibilities.  Always confirm availability, and where to report on the first day of the rotation, directly with the sponsoring faculty.
 

Commitment 

The student must commit to a minimum of 4 weeks in duration (see FM524 ECHO Free Clinic for detailed commitments). 

Fourth-year students can take up to 3 days off to interview for residency programs with advanced approval of the course director. 

Unofficial electives and preceptorships are strongly discouraged and will not be approved. 

Affiliate Sites 

Jamaica Hospital Family Medicine Residency Program  

Contact Ms. Aja Holmes at (718) 206-6919 or aholmes@jhmc.org.

Skip the rest of the steps below, as Jamaica has its own application process.  


Step Two
:  Finalize with Department of Family and Social Medicine

The student and course director MUST contact our Department of Family and Social Medicine (DFSM), Medical Student Education Office via Adriana Nieto at adriana.nieto@einstein.yu.eduor 718-430-2900 to confirm mutual approval.

Step Three:  Final Approval and Registration with the Office of Registrar 

Visiting and Osteopathic students should view the Visiting Student website for detailed application requirements and instruction as to how and when to apply for electives. All paperwork and fee requirements must be satisfied before final approval is granted by the Office of the Registrar.

All students from Einstein, LCME-accredited medical schools and osteopathic medical schools are eligible to apply for electives listed below (see individual listings for electives that are only offered to Einstein students).  Once the student has satisfied all DFSM requirements, the DFSM will notify the Office of the Registrar.  The Office of the Registrar will register students accordingly. Please check with the Office of the Registrar  Registrar@einstein.yu.edu, for more information regarding registration and final approval.

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The following electives are offered by the faculty of the Department of Family and Social Medicine at Einstein through the Montefiore Family Medicine Residency Program (Bronx, NY), the Jamaica Hospital Family Medicine Residency Program (Jamaica, Queens), the Institute for Family Health (Bronx, Manhattan, and Kingston, NY), and Bronx Lebanon Medical Center (Bronx, NY). Electives are available in the following categories:

AMBULATORY FAMILY MEDICINE 
FM509 Advanced Ambulatory Family Medicine (Montefiore)   
FM910 Advanced Ambulatory Family Medicine (Institute for Family Health: Mid-Hudson)

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

FM504 Family, Systems and Health (Montefiore) 
FM526 Understanding the Spiritual and Religious Dimension of Patients (Einstein)

COMMUNITY AND CULTURAL MEDICINE
FM517 Culture and Care (Montefiore)
FM530 Medical Spanish Immersion in the Bronx (Einstein / Institute for Family Health)

COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE
FM505 Complementary Therapies and Alternative Healing (Montefiore)
 

GLOBAL HEALTH
FM529 Global Health in Guatemala (Montefiore)

HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS
FM524 ECHO Free Clinic Longitudinal Outreach (Einstein / Institute for Family Health)

INPATIENT FAMILY MEDICINE 
FM510 Family Medicine Inpatient Service (Montefiore)

PALLIATIVE CARE
FM527 Palliative Medicine Consultation Service (Bronx Lebanon)
FM528 Palliative Care (Montefiore)

REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH
FM501 Reproductive Health (Montefiore)
FM515 Reproductive Health (Institute for Family Health: Manhattan)
 
RESEARCH IN FAMILY MEDICINE
FM521 Family Medicine Research (Einstein / Montefiore)

SOCIAL MEDICINE
FM520 Research-Based Health Activism (Montefiore)

WOUND HEALING
FM506 Preceptorship in Wound Healing (Montefiore)
 


 

*Note: The elective on Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender Healthcare (K536) has moved to the Department of Medicine.  Please see their web page for more information: http://www.einstein.yu.edu/education/student-affairs/registrar/visiting-students/elective-course-descriptions/medicine.aspx

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FM501 Reproductive Health 
(Montefiore Medical Center)
Students will participate in clinical sessions at Family Health Center and Williamsbridge to learn about the integration of full spectrum women's health into routine family medicine.  Objectives: Tailored to needs, interests, and experience of each student. Basic objectives for all students: 1. Describe strategies to integrate full-spectrum reproductive health care into routine family medicine practice; 2. Demonstrate woman-centered contraceptive counseling.  Learning Experience: The month will be composed of clinical care with supervision, reading relevant articles, and reflection on experience/learning after each clinical session. Feedback & Evaluation:  Students will receive formal feedback midway and the end of the rotation.  Evaluation will be based on direct experience in the clinic. First Day Location: Montefiore Department of Family and Social Medicine, 3544 Jerome Ave, Bronx, NY.

Marji Gold, MD
718-920-2885
marji.gold@einstein.yu.edu
Module: All 
Maximum:  2 

FM504 Family, Systems and Health (Montefiore Medical Center)
This elective will focus on family and systemic factors influencing health and the doctor-patient relationship.  Topics addressed include somatization, chronic and terminal illness in addition to common behavioral health issues presented in primary care. Objectives: Students will be able to describe typical behavioral and psychosocial approaches to medical problems in primary care.  Students will be able to examine the role of family and social relationships in health.  Students will be able to identify common systemic health care related factors which affect the health of patients from disadvantaged backgrounds. Learning Experience: Students will be able to interview patients and observe faculty during patient care sessions.  Individual tutorials, readings and attendance to didactic sessions are also available.  The elective is tailored to the interests and needs of the student. Feedback & Evaluation:  Students receive formal feedback midway and at the end of the rotation.  Verbal evaluation plus questionnaire. First Day Location:  Montefiore Department of Family and Social Medicine, 3544 Jerome Ave, Bronx, NY.

Eliana Korin, Dipl. Psic.
718-920-5523
ekorin@montefiore.org
Modules:  4A, 4AZ, 4B, 5A, 5B, 6A, 6B
Maximum:  1

FM505 Complementary Therapies and Alternative Healing 
(Montefiore Medical Center)
This elective will provide the student with an introduction to the philosophy of integrative medicine and a supervised exposure to complementary therapies and alternative healing methods in primary care settings (e.g. community health center and small practice).  Among the therapies to be covered are meditation, relaxation techniques, acupuncture, acupressure, biofeedback, shiatsu massage, chiropractic, energy and herbal medicine. Objectives:  Examine the philosophies of integrative medicine.  Analyze how these philosophies differ from Western conventional medicine.  Identify areas of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to address more deeply.  Explore these areas through reading and observation.  Examine the evidence base for these CAM approaches.  Reflect on the place of CAM approaches for self and future patients.  Describe the integration of CAM approaches in future patient care. Learning Experience: Students will read and discuss introductions to integrative medicine philosophies and techniques.  Students will rotate with practitioners of many different healing modalities depending on their interest.  Students will meet with the course director throughout the clerkship to review what they have observed and reflect on its place in their own self-care and the future care of their patients. Feedback & Evaluation: Students will receive formal feedback midway and the end of the rotation.  Evaluation is based on the student's motivation and initiative as well as their grasp of similarities and differences among a number of different healing systems and modalities.  Evaluation is also based on the student's depth of reflection on the place of integrative medicine in their future care. First Day Location: Students will contact me to schedule the first meeting.  The elective places students with practitioners throughout the city depending on their interest.

Ellen Tattelman, MD
718-920-4678
etattelm@montefiore.org
Modules:  All
Maximum: 1

FM506 Preceptorship in Wound Healing (Montefiore Medical Center)
Chronic wounds, such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, and pressure ulcers, are highly prevalent in chronically ill and elderly patients. They represent a significant public health burden and cause untold morbidity, disability, and mortality. In this elective, students will learn how to evaluate patients with chronic wounds; diagnose underlying factors that lead to physiologically impaired healing; formulate evidence-based treatment plans including topical, medical, surgical, and biologic treatment modalities; apply basic techniques of wound debridement; recognize secondary complications of wounds; and prevent wound recurrence. Upon completion of this elective, student will have the skills to become leaders in improving medical outcomes and quality of life for patients with chronic wounds. This course is highly relevant to students entering a variety of career paths, including but not limited to family medicine, internal medicine, surgery, plastic surgery, geriatrics, rehabilitation medicine, endocrinology, and infectious disease. Opportunities are available to participate in ongoing research in addition to clinical work. The elective can be tailored to students’ specific interests, in discussion with the instructor. Objectives: Evaluate patients with chronic wounds. Diagnose underlying factors that lead to physiological impaired healing. Formulate evidence-based treatment plans including topical, medical, surgical, and biologic treatment modalities. Apply basic techniques of wound debridement. Recognize secondary complications of wounds. Prevent wound recurrence. Understand health systems needs for wound patients. Learning Experience: Active participation in the inpatient Wound Healing consultation service. Outpatient care of patients with chronic wounds. Bimonthly nursing home Wound Rounds. Visits can be arranged to related services, e.g. hyperbaric medicine, home visits, vascular laboratory. The core schedule will include daily inpatient rounds, participation in bedside debridement, outpatient wound clinic 1-2 times per week, and nursing home rounds every other week. Feedback & Evaluation: Students will receive formal feedback midway through the elective and at its completion. The evaluation is compiled by the supervising physician. First Day Location: Montefiore Medical Group Grand Concourse, 2532 Grand Concourse, Ground Floor, Area C, Bronx, NY.

Anna Flattau, MD, MSc
718-920-4678
annaflattau@yahoo.com
Modules:All
Maximum: 1

FM509 Advanced Ambulatory Family Medicine (Montefiore Medical Center)
Enhance their level of competence in prevention, diagnosis and treatment of common ambulatory problems.  Integrate bio-psychosocial approaches in their care of patients and families.  Explore aspects of culturally-responsive care, the Patient-centered Medical Home, community-oriented primary care, and social medicine. Goals: Enhance their level of competence in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of common ambulatory problems. Integrate biopsychosocial approaches in their care of patients and families. Explore aspects of culturally-responsive care, the Patient-centered Medical Home, community-oriented primary care, and social medicine.  Objectives: Independently obtain a relevant patient history on patients with health problems commonly seen in the Family Medicine practice setting. Conduct an accurate physical examination relevant to the patient’s reason for seeking care in the Family Medicine practice setting. Demonstrate the clinical reasoning skills needed to assess common and uncommon acute and chronic care issues seen in the Family Medicine practice setting. Formulate and implement patient-centered management plans that integrate bio-psychosocial considerations. Independently develop an evidence-based health maintenance plan based on an individual patient's age, gender, and risk factor status. Describe the clinical expression and management principles of common acute and chronic care problems in primary care. Demonstrate time management and communication skills by setting an agenda with the patient, appropriately prioritizing acute, chronic, and prevention issues. Assess the application of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention strategies in individual, community, and public health interventions. Employ technology to access, manage, and present information in the practice of family and community medicine. Locate, review, and appraise evidence-based studies related to health problems and interventions in both clinical and community settings. Define and analyze a health problem in a specific population at the individual, family, community and public health levels. Identify principles of the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) at the clinical sites and during didactic sessions. Apply the introductory concepts of continuous quality improvement to patient-focused outcomes. Identify the impact of a service intervention on a defined health problem from a community and public health perspective. Identify and discuss the application of community-oriented primary care (COPC) principles when reviewing a community health initiative. Generate an example, at the individual, family, community, and public health levels, of the physician’s role in addressing a health problem. Independently identify the impact of health care access and utilization, health disparities, and quality of services on health outcomes. Demonstrate familiarity with novel methods of care delivery. Assist patients in dealing with system complexities. Participate in effective collaborative teaching and learning activities with peer medical students. Independently apply knowledge of prevention guidelines to promote health and prevent illness. Clearly document appropriate information in the patient record. Independently determine when it is appropriate to include other members of the health care team (e.g., nurse, health educator, social worker, subspecialist). Show respect and compassion in all professional relationships. Consistently exhibit empathetic, respectful, and non-judgmental behavior towards patients and their families. Demonstrate effective communication with patients, families, and communities that take into account socioeconomic status, cultural background, and health literacy. Demonstrate personal integrity and ethical behavior. Exhibit commitment, dependability, and responsibility. Demonstrate sensitivity and responsiveness in serving a diverse population, including but not limited to diversity in gender, age, culture, race, religion, (dis)ability, and sexual orientation. Demonstrate respect for the privacy of patients. Incorporate formative feedback into daily patient care. Identify strengths, deficiencies, and limits of one’s own knowledge and expertise. Set new learning goals based on the results of reflection on one’s own knowledge and expertise. Learning Experience: Students will be directly involved in the evaluation and treatment of ambulatory patients in patient care sites affiliated with Montefiore Medical Center, including the DSFM Family Medicine residency program.  The student will gain broad medical experiences serving diverse urban communities.  Students will work under the supervision of Family Medicine faculty, and will be expected to independently evaluate patients and formulate treatment and follow-up plans for review with their preceptors.  Students will attend all educational conferences, experience community agencies of the Bronx, and will have opportunities to attend inpatient rounds of the Family Medicine service, participate in palliative care home visits and precept cases with behavioral sciences faculty. Feedback & Evaluation: Students will receive formal feedback midway and the end of the rotation. The course directors will compile a final evaluation based upon the evaluations by all preceptors. First Day Location: Montefiore Department of Family and Social Medicine, 3544 Jerome Ave, Bronx, NY. First Day Start Time: 8:30am

William Jordan, MD, MPH
Lisa Baron, MD
718-430-2900
wjordan@montefiore.org
Modules: 1A, 1B, 2A, 3A, 3B, 4A, 4B, 5A, 5B, 6A, 6B
Maximum: 1



FM510 Family Medicine Inpatient Service (Montefiore Medical Center)
The sub-internship is a four to eight week rotation on the Family medicine inpatient unit at Montefiore Hospital.  Students will work with an interdisciplinary team to provide family centered care to adult inpatients.  There will be opportunities to attend core Family Practice and social medicine curriculum activities in the department. Objectives: Obtain a comprehensive medical and social admission history on an adult patient admitted to the family medicine inpatient service. Perform a complete and relevant physical exam on an adult patient admitted to the family medicine inpatient service. Describe the pathophysiology, natural history and clinical manifestation of the common conditions encountered on the family medicine inpatient service. Develop clinical decision making/problem solving skills, and the ability to exercise judgment about the appropriate level and options for care in the inpatient setting. Formulate a rational differential diagnoses for the presenting clinical symptoms. Formulate patient-centered treatment and management plans that integrate biopsychosocial considerations and respect patient’s preferences. Effectively explain the rationale, risks and benefits for procedures/treatments in clear, simple language that can be understood by the patient. Interpret and apply the results of routine labs and diagnostic tests. Clearly document all appropriate information in the patient record. Prioritize tasks for daily patient care to ensure patient safety and for effective time management. Appropriately utilize consultants. Communicate clearly with all members of the health care team and ancillary staff (including end of day and end of service coverage) to ensure the optimum care of the patient. Integrate preventive and screening recommendations and health education counseling tailored to patient’s demographic and risk factors. Formulate a patient and family-centered discharge plan encompassing a comprehensive and longitudinal patient care plan while demonstrating understanding of financial and insurance constraints. Communicate discharge plans, including medication reconciliation and follow-up, with the outpatient primary care provider. Consistently exhibit empathetic, respectful and non-judgmental behavior towards patients and their families. Demonstrate sensitivity and responsiveness to a diverse patient population, including but not limited to diversity in gender, age, culture, race, religion, disabilities, and sexual orientation. Exhibit reliability and show respect in all professional interactions. Identify strengths, deficiencies, and limits in one’s own knowledge and expertise. Set new learning goals based on the results of reflection on one’s own knowledge and expertise and on feedback from others appraisal of evidence-based studies related to health problems encountered in the inpatient setting. Learning Experience: Students will work with the team (which also includes nurses, social workers and a clinical pharmacist) to care for patients from the department’s health centers, as well as from the emergency department.  Students will have the opportunity to work up admissions, place orders, present patients on rounds, perform procedures and discuss management with consultants.  In addition, they will participate in the team's call schedule. Feedback & Evaluation: Students will receive formal feedback midway and the end of the rotation.  Teaching attending physicians contribute to the final evaluation. First Day Location: Montefiore Moses Campus, Unit NW7, 111 E 210th St, Bronx, NY 10467. First Day Start Time: 7am.

Maria Santos, MD
Purnima Garg, MBBS
718-430-2900
maria.santos@einstein.yu.edu  
Modules: 1A, 1B, 2B, 3A, 3B, 4A, 4AZ, 4B, 5A, 5B, 6A, 6B
Maximum: 1
 

FM515 Women's Reproductive Health (Institute for Family Health: Manhattan)
**NOT OFFERED TO VISITING STUDENTS**
The purpose of this experience is to provide students with exposure to abortion care in a family medicine practice where abortion care is integrated or mainstreamed into the day to day family medicine setting.  They will also observe proactive contraception prescribing in order to prevent unintended pregnancies, including IUD and implant insertions. Objectives: I. Medical Knowledge: the student will be able to: 1. Describe the differences between suction abortion and medical abortion and know the indications and contraindications for each. 2. Describe contraceptive options and know which choices can be offered post-medication and suction abortion. 3. Know the elements of pre-and post-operative care. 4. Identify the structures of an early pregnancy on a trans-vaginal sonogram. II. Patient Care Objectives: the student will be able to: 1. Demonstrate skill in informing a patient that she is pregnant and in options counseling. 2. Develop beginning skills at performing transvaginal sonography for gestational dating, pregnancy location and completion of a medication abortion. 3. Demonstrate caring and respectful behavior when interacting with patients and when discussing patient care with colleagues and staff. III. Interpersonal skills: the student will be able to: 1. Establish rapport with the woman, using respectful language in asking the patient to position herself for a sonogram or gynecologic care without any physical handling. 2.  Communicate clearly and concisely with the patient regarding procedure and management. 3.  Convey a caring, non-judgmental attitude. 4.  Solicit and answer patient’s questions prior to the sonogram or abortion and converse with the patient during procedures in effort to promote her comfort. 5.  Use supervision appropriately. IV. Practice based learning and improvement; the student will be able to: 1. Discuss the impact of receiving full-spectrum reproductive health care in the family medicine setting on patients, as opposed to a situation where the patients are sent to specialty family planning clinics for care. 2. Use information from the readings to support patient care decisions and patient education. V. Professionalism: the student will be able to: 1. Demonstrate a non-judgmental and respectful attitude towards the patients accessing abortion care in the family medicine practice. 2. Demonstrate sensitivity to the needs of women from diverse backgrounds and with limited financial resources in facilitating their choice of future contraception after their abortions. 3. Demonstrate a commitment to excellence in the development of skills. 4. Observe the patient’s verbal and non-verbal signals during the procedure, and respond appropriately. VI. Systems-based Practice: the student will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an ability to compare and contrast the systems of health care provided by our family medicine practice as compared to high volume family planning clinics. 2. Understand the role of financial constraints on the provision of abortion care. 3. Be able to assist patients in dealing with system complexities, being sensitive to their needs in relation to referrals, prescriptions and follow-up care. Learning Experience: The students on this rotation will observe first trimester abortion services and contraceptive procedures, as well as many other family medicine procedures, all in the family medicine center. The students will learn to counsel women on options for unintended pregnancy, to provide medication abortions, and to do follow-up visits.  They will also provide contraceptive counseling, observe IUD and implant insertions, and minor gynecological procedures such as endometrial biopsy, diaphragm and pessary fitting, wart treatments, bartholin cyst drainage, etc.  They will also see first trimester ultrasounds and may observe vasectomy counseling and procedures.  Since these are general procedure sessions, where other residents on dermatology and ambulatory surgery rotations are present doing procedures as well, the reproductive health procedures are integrated into the general family medicine procedural template.  An additional list of readings is provided. The students will also participate in the Saturday Women’s Free Clinic, and the evening IUD session for teens.  The student will also see patients under the supervision of the Reproductive Health Fellow.  Some general family medicine sessions will be included in the elective, during times when there are no procedure sessions. Feedback & Evaluation: Students will receive formal feedback after each procedure and observed counseling and the end of the rotation. The evaluation is compiled from feedback solicited by the supervising physician from the entire faculty who worked with the student. First Day Location: Phillips Family Practice, 16 E 16 St, New York, NY.

Dr. Linda Prine
(917) 920-2855
lindaprine@mac.com
Modules: 1A, 3A, 3B, 4A, 4AZ, 4B, 5A, 5B, 6A, 6B
Maximum: 1 

Textbook: ISBN 0323052673, $141, Procedures for Primary Care, 3rd Edition (2010), Pfenninger and Fowler

FM517 Culture and Care (Montefiore Medical Center)
This elective will address the complexities of providing medical care to patients from diverse socio-cultural backgrounds.  Students will have the opportunity to see patients at a community health clinic to examine medical problems in relation to particular socio-cultural determinants.  They will learn about health beliefs and practices among diverse socio-cultural groups, immigrant health issues and their impact to the doctor-patient relationship and health care in general. Objectives: Formulate medical problems within a socio-cultural framework.  Examine typical clinical problems in relation to social determinants of health.  Integrate a socio-cultural perspective into the medical interview.  Describe common challenges faced by immigrants and their impact on health and health care. Learning Experience: Interview with patients, and observations of faculty interactions with patients; readings, videotape reviews and tutorials. Feedback & Evaluation: Students will receive formal feedback midway and at the end of the rotation.  Teaching faculty contribute to the final evaluation. First Day Location: Montefiore Department of Family and Social Medicine, 3544 Jerome Ave, Bronx, NY.  

Eliana Korin, Dipl. Psic.
718- 920-5523
ekorin@montefiore.org
Modules:  1A, 1B, 2A, 4A, 4AZ, 4B, 5A, 5B, 6A, 6B
Maximum:  1 

FM520 Research-based Health Activism (Montefiore Medical Center)
This four week elective is an opportunity to develop skills and knowledge in research methods, health policy, and advocacy. Students choose a specific health care issue and develop a research proposal and advocacy plan that address this issue. Projects are completed in the remaining academic year with ongoing mentorship. Objectives:  Define the concept of "Research-Based Health Activism." Describe the organization of the US health system and current policy priorities.  Develop a specific research question that can be quantifiably evaluated. Develop an advocacy plan for making use of research findings to influence public policy. Increase confidence and competence in public speaking, media relations, and meeting with legislators.  Prepare and present a research proposal that includes a background, research question, methods, and an advocacy plan. Learning Experience: Learning experiences range from didactic seminars with leading health policy experts to skill-building workshops with health care activists. There are three curricular foci: 1) Background on the US health system and politics; 2) Basic epidemiology and biostatistics; and 3) Advocacy skills. Students will participate in hands on learning about media relations, coalition building, and public speaking. Students will visit community-based organizations and nationally renowned experts who influence public policy. There will be in depth reading on the social determinants of health. Students will meet with physician who engaged in research-based health activism throughout their careers. Hours are 9am – 5pm and there is no call schedule. Feedback & Evaluation: Students will receive formal feedback at the mid-point and end of the elective.  Evaluations will be based on attendance, participation, completion of weekly assignments, and completion of final project proposal. First Day Location:  Montefiore Department of Family and Social Medicine, 3544 Jerome Ave, Bronx, NY. First Day Start Time: 9am.

Aaron Fox, MD, MS
718-944-3854 or 718-920-2627
adfox@montefiore.org
josbyfie@montefiore.org (Josephine Byfield)
Module: 3B 
Maximum: 10 students

FM521  Family Medicine Research (Einstein / Montefiore)
Students who are interested in conducting primary care research, health services research or epidemiology of urban populations may arrange to work with a faculty member of the DFSM research division.  Students will be matched to a faculty supervisor whose research area and expertise matches the student's interest and goals. Objectives:  Students will identify a topic and specific learning objectives with the faculty supervisor at the beginning of the elective.  Students will acquire skills in some or all of the following areas, depending on experience and scope of project:  literature synthesis, study design, data collection, data analysis, and writing for publication.  All students will acquire a basic understanding of human subjects concerns as they relate to their project. Learning Experience: Specific learning experiences will vary with the project selected. Feedback & Evaluation: Students will receive formal feedback midway and the end of the rotation.  The course director will complete the final evaluation. First Day Location:  DFSM Research Division, 1300 Morris Park Ave, Block 4th Floor, Bronx, NY.

Diane McKee, MD, MS
718-430-2154 or 718-430-2750
diane.mckee@einstein.yu.edu 
Modules: All
Maximum: 2 

FM524 ECHO Free Clinic Longitudinal Outreach (Einstein / Institute for Family Health)
**NOT OFFERED TO VISITING STUDENTS**
The Walton Family Practice Einstein Community Health Outreach ("ECHO") Free Clinic provides free health care for uninsured adults in the South Bronx, a medically underserved area (MUA).  The clinic sees about 30 patients each session, offering primary care services such as physical examinations, women's health, prescription medications, laboratory tests, health education, and social services.  This longitudinal elective trains senior medical students in ambulatory care management so that they may become ECHO Clinic Session Coordinators, working with faculty physician and nurse practitioner preceptors, MS-III Family Medicine clerks, pre-clinical volunteers, and ancillary staff to provide free care and social service referrals to those in need. In addition, this elective provides students with research opportunities regarding the challenges of delivering primary care at a community-based health center in a medically underserved area. Learning objectives: Obtain a comprehensive medical and social admission history on an adult patient admitted to the family medicine inpatient service. Perform a complete and relevant physical exam on an adult patient admitted to the family medicine inpatient service. Describe the pathophysiology, natural history and clinical manifestation of the common conditions encountered on the family medicine inpatient service. Develop clinical decision making/problem solving skills, and the ability to exercise judgment about the appropriate level and options for care in the inpatient setting. Formulate a rational differential diagnoses for the presenting clinical symptoms. Formulate patient-centered treatment and management plans that integrate biopsychosocial considerations and respect patient’s preferences. Effectively explain the rationale, risks and benefits for procedures/treatments in clear, simple language that can be understood by the patient. Interpret and apply the results of routine labs and diagnostic tests. Clearly document all appropriate information in the patient record. Prioritize tasks for daily patient care to ensure patient safety and for effective time management. Appropriately utilize consultants. Communicate clearly with all members of the health care team and ancillary staff (including end of day and end of service coverage) to ensure the optimum care of the patient. Integrate preventive and screening recommendations and health education counseling tailored to patient’s demographic and risk factors. Formulate a patient and family-centered discharge plan encompassing a comprehensive and longitudinal patient care plan while demonstrating understanding of financial and insurance constraints. Communicate discharge plans, including medication reconciliation and follow-up, with the outpatient primary care provider. Consistently exhibit empathetic, respectful and non-judgmental behavior towards patients and their families. Demonstrate sensitivity and responsiveness to a diverse patient population, including but not limited to diversity in gender, age, culture, race, religion, disabilities, and sexual orientation. Exhibit reliability and show respect in all professional interactions. Identify strengths, deficiencies, and limits in one’s own knowledge and expertise. Set new learning goals based on the results of reflection on one’s own knowledge and expertise and on feedback from others appraisal of evidence-based studies related to health problems encountered in the inpatient setting. Learning experience: For the clinical part of the elective, the student will work as session coordinator for 10 sessions. As Session Coordinators (SCs), students are responsible for the administration and scheduling of volunteers at the clinic for that week under the supervision of the attending physicians and Medical Director (Dr. Cortijo). A typical week consists of pre-, during-, and post-session tasks. Pre-session duties begin early in the week and involve planning, organizing, and educating the pre-clinical volunteers and Family Medicine clerks.  At each clinic session, the SC gives a didactic orientation to the volunteers of the day, and facilitates patient triage and/or flow. The Triage SC focuses on seeing as many as 15 walk-in patients per session. The Flow SC assigns patients, and provides advice on clinical and EMR issues. The SCs also assist MS-III clerks with phlebotomy, in-house labs, and injections. Weekly during-session tasks also include reviewing laboratory and referral results with the preceptors and arranging follow-up care. Post-session, SCs write a post-session summary of the clinic experience, the performances of every volunteer, any issues or problems encountered during the session, and suggested areas for improvement of patient care and follow-up. The SCs communicate with the SCs in charge of the next session, to ensure continuity of care. At the end of the elective, the student arranges a portfolio of their session summaries and/or SOAP notes. Students must finish the clinical component of the elective (10 sessions at the ECHO Clinic) prior to a one-month reading tutorial under the guidance of Dr. Hal Strelnick during module 6A. The tutorial contextualizes their work in the broader health care system.  Two weeks of discussions and seminars led by Dr. Strelnick, are followed by two weeks of research culminating in a capstone paper.

ECHO Free Clinic Longitudinal Outreach = 10 Clinical Sessions (Session Coordinators) & 4 Weeks Research Reading Elective (2 Weeks Discussion/Seminars & 2 Weeks Paper/Research Time)

Method of student feedback and evaluation:  Overall, students will be evaluated in two parts. Dr. Strelnick will be evaluating the reading tutorial and paper completed by the student. Dr. Cortijo will evaluate from direct observation and from feedback provided from ECHO clinic faculty attending physicians and nurse practitioners. She will also be in charge of putting together the final course grade based on the student’s average of their tutorial, research, and clinical evaluations. Mid-way evaluations, discussing professional strengths and areas of improvement, will be performed by Dr. Cortijo after the student has completed ten clinic sessions as SC. In addition, students will receive frequent feedback after each session by the clinic chairs and attending physicians regarding the students’ clinical, leadership, and communication skills. First Day Location: Walton Family Health Center, 1894 Walton Ave, Bronx, NY 10463.

Amarilys Cortijo, MD
Hal Strelnick, MD
718-583-9000
acortijo@institute2000.org
hstrelni@montefiore.org
Modules: 5B and 6A
Maximum: 10 

FM526 Understanding the Spiritual and Religious Dimension of Patients (Einstein)
**NOT OFFERED TO VISITING STUDENTS**
This elective course explores spirituality and religion as it impacts patient's health and care management.  A combination of clinical experiences and classroom seminars are provided to build knowledge, skills and potential change in attitude surrounding the importance of this patient dimension.  Students are encouraged to reflect on their own religious and spiritual selves as it impacts the doctor-patient relationship and sustains the practice of humanistic medicine. Objectives: Develop a respect for and collaborative relationship with clergy and other spiritual leaders as members of an inter-professional team.  Understand that spirituality and religion provides a view of life for some patients that gives hope, meaning and a sense of security during health, illness, pain and suffering and at the end of life.  Learn the communication skills to address spirituality and religion with patients that respect their beliefs and values regarding health and health care management. Explore and reflect on one's spiritual and/or religious self as it may impact the doctor-patient relationship and help to sustain the practice of humanistic medicine. Learning Experience:  Opportunities include joining a hospital chaplain on patient visits; interviewing patients with chronic illness, terminal illness and pain, and attending conferences/lectures and seminars.  Complementary and alternative practices within the realm of spirituality will be included.  Weekly seminars focus on discussions with core faculty facilitators and invited guests regarding the intersections of patient’s spirituality with clinical issues, assigned readings and research studies. Clinical encounters at a variety of in-patient and out-patient settings. Groups discussions of experiences and readings in Montefiore and the CSC. Feedback & Evaluation: Students are encouraged to reflect on their experiences and reactions in small groups discussions with faculty and peers.  Faculty writes comments in response to this essay.  In addition, we write an end of year evaluation for each student using the standard elective evaluation form.  Einstein students who need to fulfill their SP requirements can be mentored in this elective, if they pick a related topic to the elective. First Day Location: RLG Clinical Skills Center, Van Etten Building, Einstein, 1300 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, NY.

Mimi McEvoy, NP, MA
718-430-3167
mimi.mcevoy@einstein.yu.edu
Module:  6B
Maximum: 6

FM527 Palliative Medicine Consultation Service (Bronx Lebanon)
The student will have intensive exposure to full spectrum palliative care inpatient activities with underserved African American, Latino and other largely minority patients. Objectives: Interview and examine patients and participate in family counseling with the guidance and assistance of the Palliative Medicine Consultation Service team members.  Present and discuss care options for patients seen in consultation.  Read didactic material on palliative care.  Be provided with one-on-one teaching from the attending physician, nurse practitioner and social worker.  Emphasis will be placed on the issues unique to end of life care faced by an inner city, underserved population. Learning Experience: Students will accompany palliative care team members, including nurse practitioners, social workers, physicians, and patient advocates.  They will also conduct preliminary consults. Feedback & Evaluation: Students will receive formal feedback midway and the end of the rotation.  Teaching attending physicians contribute to the final narrative evaluation. First Day Location: Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center, Milstein 7-F. 

Joseph Sacco, MD
718-960-1261
jsacco@bronxleb.org
Modules:  All 
Maximum:  2

FM528 Palliative Care (Montefiore Medical Center)
The purpose of this elective is to introduce fourth year medical students to the philosophy, principles and practice of Palliative Care. During the elective, the student will participate in the multidisciplinary team assessment and management of patients on the inpatient palliative care suite, on home hospice, and throughout the hospital, including patients in oncology, MICU, and the SICU.  The course will include teaching on pain and symptom management, the palliation of HIV disease, psychiatric issues at the end of life, advance directives and bioethical issues related to end of life care. Objective: Learn how to assess pain and non-pain symptoms.  Observe palliative care assessment and management for the home visit.  Recognize the role of the interdisciplinary team in hospice and palliative care.  Describe how to assess and communicate prognosis.  Describe the use of opioids in pain and non-pain symptom management.  Describe the use of non-opioid analgesics, adjuvant analgesics, and other pharmacologic approaches to the management of both pain and non-pain symptoms.  Recognize common social problems experienced by patients and families facing life-threatening conditions and describe appropriate clinical assessment and management.  Demonstrate knowledge of, and recognizes limitations of, evidence-based medicine in palliative care.  Use empathic and facilitating verbal behaviors such as: naming, affirmation, normalization, reflection, silence, listening, self-disclosure, and humor in an effective and appropriate manner.  Demonstrate knowledge of the various settings and related structures for organizing, regulating, and financing care for patients at the end of life. Learning Experience: Students will have an overview lecture on palliative care, read selected review articles and take a pre-test of palliative care knowledge to review with the course director.  Students will assess new and follow up patients on the consultation and inpatient services under the direction of the course directors.  Students will make home hospice visits and participate in interdisciplinary team discussions on patient care. Feedback & Evaluation: Students will receive formal feedback at the end of the rotation.  The course director will complete a 360 assessment form with written comments. First Day Location: Montefiore Moses Campus, Unit NW7, 111 E 210th St, Bronx, NY 10467.

Jhosselini Cardenas, MD
jcardena@montefiore.org
Modules: 1A, 2B, 3A, 3B, 4A, 4AZ, 4B, 5A, 5B, 6A, 6B
Maximum: 1

FM529 Global Health in Guatemala (Montefiore Medical Center)
**NOT OFFERED TO VISITING STUDENTS**
There are a limited number of positions available for medical students in Central and South America.  Research opportunities exist at a large HIV clinic in Guatemala City.  Clinical opportunities exist in both rural and urban settings throughout the region.  Interested students should send their CV and a cover letter to Dr. Anderson before registering. Objectives: Develop familiarity with clinical management of HIV in a non-HAART setting.  Understand the social and economic context of HIV in Guatemala.  Improve Spanish.  Participate in an ongoing research problem. Learning Experience: Students will work in an HIV outpatient and inpatient care under supervision, visit CBO involve in HIV and participate in research. Feedback & Evaluation: Students will receive formal feedback weekly.  Verbal reports of supervisors in Guatemala. First Day Location: Clinica Luis Angel Garcia, Guatemala City, Guatemala.

Matthew Anderson, MD, MPH
917-817-1986
andersonma@aol.com
Modules: All 
Maximum: 1 

FM530 Medical Spanish Immersion in the Bronx (Einstein / Institute for Family Health)
This elective will provide a Medical Spanish Immersion experience in the Bronx.  Intermediate Spanish is required (will be assessed by instructor prior to receiving approval for elective). Student will work with an interdisciplinary team and will conduct interviews and physicals with mono-lingual Spanish speaking patients. Objectives: Develop competence in communicating with Spanish-speaking patients, particularly in the Bronx community.  Develop competence in asking yes/no questions and open-ended questions using different grammatical tenses to avoid inaccuracy while conducting the medical interview in Spanish.  Be familiar with some Spanglish terms used by Latino/Hispanic patients.  Develop a wide variety of medical Spanish terminology through the textbook and Latino/Hispanic patients at the Mount Hope Family Practice.  Learn about Latino/Hispanic patients’ most common cultural and health beliefs.  Learn about some herbal and home remedies used by the Latino population. Learning Activities: Two mornings a week, the student will receive intensive Medical Spanish instruction and assessment at the medical school. Most of the clinical experience will be at Mt. Hope Health Center supervised by Dr. Cortijo. At the clinic, the student will conduct interviews, review of systems and physicals in Spanish.  Student is also expected to work with the clinical team (social worker, nurse) on providing support and health education, especially on diabetes.  Student will also be required to attend 2 seminars on Ethno-medicinal plant use in the Latino population. Feedback & Evaluation: Student will receive formal feedback midway and at the end of the rotation.  Formal evaluation of Medical Spanish assessed by instructor testing, and an evaluation by the attending by observation of clinical and language skills. First Day Location: Mount Hope Family Practice, 130 W Tremont Ave, Bronx, NY.

Amarilys Cortijo, MD
718-583-9000
acortijo@institute2000.org
Modules: 6A
Maximum: 2


FM910 Advanced Ambulatory Family Medicine (Institute for Family Health: Mid-Hudson)
**NOT OFFERED TO VISITING STUDENTS**
This rotation is for students with an interest in Family Medicine as a career, offering a community-based experience in a small Hudson Valley city.  Students will work in an active family medicine center seeing a wide variety of outpatient conditions in a diverse underserved patient population. Important Information for Students about this Elective: Car required for travel between Hospital & Outpatient Center(s); Meals & parking provided at no cost; 90 miles north of NYC, easy access to NYS Thruway; Outstanding recreational opportunities during downtime (hiking, skiing, rock climbing, etc.); Optional oncall which may include obstetrical opportunities. Objectives: Explore career opportunities in Family Medicine. Improve patient care management utilizing an electronic health record. Gain a better understanding of biopsychosocial model of health care. Enhance communication skills. Develop an awareness of primary prevention practices. Learning Experience: Work with family medicine attendings and residents in a busy ambulatory teaching health center. Attend daily didactic conferences. Develop a relationship with a designated patient and meet with them on multiple occasions (office and/or home visits). Present a case-based talk to the residents/faculty based upon this patient. Feedback & Evaluation: Students will receive formal feedback midway and the end of the rotation. The course directors will compile a final evaluation based upon the evaluations by all preceptors. The student’s final evaluation will be a composite of feedback from their rotation preceptors, participation in conferences and performance on required Index Case Presentation. First Day Location: Mid-Hudson Family Practice Residency Program, Administrative Office, 396 Broadway, Kingston, NY 12401.

Mark Josefski, MD
mjosefski@institute2000.org 
845-334-2700 ext. 2494 (Ms. Yisaira Mendez)
ymendez@institute2000.org 
Modules: All
Maximum: 3 
 

 

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