Registrar Office

Department of Medicine (2014)


K502  Clinical Endocrinology (Jacobi Medical Center/Weiler Hospital)
**Not Available to International Exchange Students**
The purpose of the elective is to provide clinical experience in-patient and out-patient Endocrinology accompanied by didactic instruction. The elective is full time. There are two similar programs, one on the East campus (K502) and one on the West campus (K516).   The outpatient component is the same in both electives.  The in-patient consultation service is similar but at different locations. The student will function as a member of the Department of Medicine Endocrinology Consultative Team, including medical residents and endocrinology fellows, to provide service to inpatients at one of two sites: 1) Jacobi Medical Center and Weiler Hospital or 2) Moses Division of Montefiore and North Central Bronx Hospital. Work rounds are held daily, and attending rounds occur generally three times weekly.  The student will have the opportunity to participate in the following clinics: 1. Monday Morning- CFCC Diabetes and Endocrinology Clinic; 2. Tuesday Afternoon- Jacobi Endocrinology Clinic; 3. Wednesday Morning- Reproductive Endocrinology Clinic; 4. Thursday Morning- Montefiore Diabetes clinic; 5. Friday Afternoon- Montefiore Endocrine Clinic. The student will have the opportunity to attend the following conferences:  1. Monday AM- Multidisciplinary Diabetes Conference (preceding CFCC Clinic); 2. Monday Afternoon- Endocrinology Fellows Conference (at Moses);  3. Thursday Morning- Diabetes Journal Club (preceding Montefiore Diabetes Clinic); 4. Friday Morning- Clinical Endocrinology Grand Rounds followed by Diabetes Research Center Conference.  It is expected that the student will develop familiarity with endocrine evaluation and a variety of endocrine diseases.  Emphasis on basic physiological concepts as related to endocrine disorders is stressed.  For further information, contact

Norman Fleischer, MD
Contact: Ms. Maritza Reyes, Program Supervisor,  marreyes@montefiore.org , 718-920-2017
Modules All
Maximum 2



K503A  Dermatology (Montefiore Medical Center)
A four week elective during which time fourth year students will spend time at Jacobi and MMC participating in: Adult and Pediatric Dermatology clinics, Dermatology rounds, Clinical Conferences, Didactic Sessions, Faculty Practice. Specific student-oriented conferences occur throughout the elective, e.g. post-clinic, clinical diagnostic conference.

Steven R. Cohen, MD
Contact Ms. Jennifer Matos, jematos@montefiore.org, 718-920-2680
Modules: All (please do not sign up for the which you have more than 3 interviews)
Maximum 6
On the first day students report to: 3411 Wayne Avenue, 2nd Floor, Suite D, Bronx, NY 10467 at 7:30AM



K503B  Dermatology Preceptorship (Montefiore Medical Center)

Fourth year medical student elective; requisite 4-week rotation. Students will work primarily with either Chief of Service or other core academic faculty* four-full days of the week in conjunction with two half-days of attending resident didactic. The clinical service features complex medical and pediatric dermatology, as well as dermatologic surgery. Presentation of live cases at Dermatology Grand Rounds and other didactic sessions are encouraged. The elective incorporates participation in all teaching conferences, including clinical slide sessions and dermatopathology (Two half days weekly).

 

*During the months of June, July, August and September, the primary faculty assignment to one of three concomitant K503B Preceptorship electives will be based on a lottery for the first 12 applicants. This module will only be open to one student per month for the remaining months of the year. Participating faculty include Steven R. Cohen, MD, Ranon Mann, MD, Adam Friedman, MD, Caroline Halverstam, MD, and Beth McLellan, MD.


Steven R. Cohen, MD
Contact Ms. Jennifer Matos, jematos@montefiore.org, 718-920-2680 

On the first day students report to: 3411 Wayne Avenue, 2nd Floor, Suite D, Bronx, NY 10467 at 7:30AM

Modules: All
Maximum 4 Einstein students only during modules 1A-2B; 1 student during remaining modules



K503C Dermatolology Clinical Research
The Dermatology Clinical Trials Unit at Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine provides an in-depth experience in clinical research related to Dermatology. A clinical clerkship with our team will allow motivated senior medical students to gain valuable experience in all aspects of clinical research and a working knowledge of the research process.  Students will participate in day-to-day activities of the Dermatology Clinical Trials Unit, including devising and implementing studies, submitting proposals and amendments to the IRB, writing research grants, recruiting and enrolling patients, and following study procedures. In doing so, students will gain an understanding of the drug development process and learn good clinical practices and ethics of medical research. They will develop proficiency in the planning, implementation and conduct of clinical trials and develop effective interpersonal and communication skills with study patients, their families, members of the research staff, and pharmaceutical sponsors in the clinical research setting.

Steven R. Cohen, MD
Contact: Michelle W. Ma, MD 718-920-8470 dermpharmeinstein@gmail.com and Ms. Jennifer Matos, jematos@montefiore.org, 718-920-2680
Modules: All, except 4AZ, 4B.
Maximum: 1
On the first day students report to: 3411 Wayne Avenue, 2nd Floor, Suite D, Bronx, NY 10467 at 7:30AM




K504 Rheumatology (Jacobi Medical Center/Weiler)
The student will examine and evaluate selected Jacobi and Weiler Hospital patients under the supervision of the Rheumatology Trainee and Attending and read some of the relevant literature.  This student will, at times, be responsible for performing both initial and follow up history and physical examinations of our clinical outpatients and inpatients on the consult service.  This is a highly valuable elective, very strong educations component since many of our diseases are multi-systemic.  Finally, students will have the opportunity to learn the procedure skill of arthrocentesis as well.  The student will attend clinic in the morning at Jacobi or Moses through Thursday and weekly Journal Club and Grand Rounds Fridays 8 AM to 10AM.  Inpatient rounds scheduling will be variable depending on the Attending but typically are three times per week.

Learning objectives and assessment:
Medical Knowledge: The student will have gained medical knowledge in the field of Rheumatology and be able to evaluate and treat common Rheumatologic conditions. Gain knowledge in interpretation of common Rheumatologic laboratory tests and imaging. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty (Attending and Fellows) Assessment.
Patient care: Demonstrate the ability to gather information from a patient with a Rheumatologic condition and do a thorough Rheumatologic examination of joints and other appropriate areas. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment, Direct Bedside Observation. The student will be able to interpret the history, physical exam, laboratory tests and radiologic studies and come up with a differential diagnosis and treatment plan for Rheumatology patients. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment, Direct Faculty Bedside Observation.
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement: Learned to use local resources to research issues and read regarding their Rheumatologic patient as an independent adult learner.  Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment, Global Peer Assessment.
Interpersonal and Communication Skills: Communicate clearly, compassionately, and effectively with patients and their families regarding Rheumatologic conditions. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment, Direct Faculty Bedside Observation.  Communicate clearly, and effectively both in written and verbal form with other clinicians and health care personnel regarding Rheumatologic patients. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment, Direct Faculty Bedside Observation.
Professionalism: The student will demonstrate respect, compassion, integrity and honesty with regard to patient care and maintain patient confidentiality when consulting on a Rheumatologic patient. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment, Direct Faculty Bedside Observation. Demonstrate a commitment to carrying out professional responsibilities and adherence to ethical principles regarding patients with Rheumatologic diseases. Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment.
Systems Based Practice: The student will interact with the primary physician team, consulting attending, and allied health care personnel as part of a health care team. Learn to help the patient navigate the healthcare system to obtain needed aide and care for those with Rheumatologic conditions.  Assessment Method: Self Assessment, Global Faculty Assessment.
Supervision: The resident on Rheumatology elective is supervised by the Rheumatology attending and fellow on consults that month.

Learning experience:
Participation in outpatient and inpatient evaluations
Perform focused musculoskeletal history and physical exam
Participate in patient care and Attending Rounds
Interpret laboratory results and basic imaging pertinent to MSK Medicine
Attempt to perform the procedure skill of arthrocentesis and joint injection.

Students are responsible to work with the Rheumatology fellow to see inpatient consults and present them on attending rounds that day. There are teaching rounds at least three times per week with the fellow and attending during which the resident presents new consults and follow-ups on previously seen patients. The student should be prepared to discuss the differential diagnosis and pertinent medical literature.  

The residents will participate in weekly educational and clinic activities:
Monday AM Jacobi Joint Pain Clinic Building 8:30AM, 4A
Tues AM Lupus Clinic at 8:30 AM MMC
Wed AM- Rheumatology Clinic, 8:30AM MMC
Thurs AM- Jacobi Rheumatology Clinic Building 8:30AM, 4B
Friday 8AM-10AM Journal Club and Grand Rounds, AECOM
There are also Rehab and Radiology teaching sessions during each month.

Resources
-American College of Rheumatology on-line Educational Resources http://www.rheumatology.org/education/resources/index.asp
-Up-To-Date for topic review
-AECOM Library (and electronic library) resources to look up articles on patients
-MKSAP on Rheumatology
-Kelly’s Textbook of Rheumatology

Irene Blanco, MD
Irene.blanco@einstein.yu.edu
Program Coordinator: Ms. Esmeralda Cordero, esmarelda.cordero@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-2078
Modules All
Maximum 2 Student
STUDENTS MUST CALL THE RHEUMATOLOGY FELLOW ON CALL THE WEEK PRIOR TO FIND OUT EXACTLY WHERE AND WHEN TO REPORT ON THE FIRST DAY.  The student can also call the Program Coordinator Ms. Cordero.



K505  Infectious Diseases (Jacobi Medical Center)
**Not available to visiting students**
Students will round with the Adult Medicine ID service on the Jacobi Wards.  A wide variety of infectious diseases are seen during the month, including possible bacterial, viral and parasitic. The rotation is unique in that we see trauma patients and burn patients. These cases are fully evaluated and presented on daily rounds to the Infectious Disease Fellow and Attending Physician for differential diagnosis and therapeutic options.  Students are introduced to basic techniques of clinical microbiology with particular reference to the patients they are following.  The students also attend in weekly seminars and combined Pediatric-Medicine Infectious Disease Rounds at Einstein and Montefiore Hospital. For students interested in parasitology can attend the weekly Tropical Medicine Clinic run by Dr. Coyle during their elective month. Please let her know in advance

Learning objectives: By the end of this elective students will be able to:
-Describe and interpret results of positive blood cultures
-Understand and describe the spectrum and coverage of different antibiotics and their appropriate usage
-Complete appropriate infectious disease consult and follow up

Learning experience: Students will see patients Mondays – Friday from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM, some days they may be required to stay later if rounds extend beyond 5:00 PM. They should discuss this with their attending. They are off on hospital holidays. They will see Inpatient Infectious Disease consults.  They will present to Infectious Disease fellows and attendings.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Verbal by the attending, Course director provides the written

Christina Coyle, MD
Christina.Coyle@einstein.yu.edu
718-918-5660
Modules: All
Maximum 3 students
On the first day students report to: Parasitology Clinic located at 5NW1) at 9:00 am and ask for Phyllis Andrews, Phyllis.andrews@nbhn.net, 718-918-5639.



K506 Infectious Diseases (Weiler Hospital)
Adult patients with probable bacterial, viral, mycotic, parasitic, or rickettsial diseases are evaluated and presented on rounds daily to the infectious disease fellow and attending physician for differential diagnosis, recommendations for basic and advanced microbiologic testing, therapeutic options, and discussion.  Basic techniques of clinical microbiology learned during the second year course in Microbiology and Infectious Diseases are reviewed with particular reference to the patients seen.  Students also attend seminars and combined Pediatric-Medicine Infectious Disease Grand Rounds.  A highly useful elective no matter what field a student is considering for a career because nearly all types of physicians see patients with infections and use antibiotics. Faculty: Drs. J. Achkar, J. Daily, M. Desruisseaux, M. Feldmesser, B. Fries, M. Keller, K. Kim, I. Leviton, T. Madaline, J. Nosanchuk, L. Pirofski, A. Sharma, H. Tanowitz, and L. Weiss.

Ira Leviton, MD
Contact: Ms. Angie Vega, avega@montefiore.org, 718-920-5438
Modules: All
Maximum 2 students
On the first day of the elective report to 10S-21 at 8:30 A.M.  Students should contact Ms. Angie Vega at least one day in advance to make sure that the fellows will be available at these times and to get the Grand Rounds and core curriculum lecture by e-mail.



K508 Clinical Hematology (Weiler Hospital)
This is a supervised elective where students participate in the consult service at Weiler.  They will be able to evaluate and follow-up their own hematology patients. They will make rounds four times/week with the Hematology Fellow and the Attending Hematologist.  In addition to learning about blood and hemostasis disorders, they will become proficient at making and interpreting peripheral blood smears and bone marrow aspirates with the Attending Hematologist.  The student will attend at least two specialty clinics (Hematology Clinic at CFCC and a choice of Hematology Clinic at MMC or Faculty Practice at MMP).  Each student will attend weekly conferences on Coagulation, Hemoglobinopathies and "Interesting Case Presentation", biweekly Journal Club and Transfusion Sessions, as well as weekly Hematology Grand Rounds.  This is a bicampus elective; the student will be expected to attend conferences at both Moses and Einstein.

Ellen Friedman, MD
elfriedm@montefiore.org 
Contact: Ms. Tawana Alvarez taalvare@montefiore.org , 718-920-4137
Modules: All
Maximum: 3
On first day students should report to 3411 Wayne Ave. Ground Floor, at 8 am



K509 Clinical Nephrology (Weiler Hospital)
Students participate in the work-up and management of hospitalized and ambulatory patients with renal disease, high blood pressure and electrolyte abnormalities. They attend the Nephrology clinic and receive instruction in hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and transplantation.  They attend all specialty and teaching rounds. There is a full schedule of conferences related to both clinical and research activities. Renal physiology is stressed both at conferences and in evaluation of patients.

Amanda Raff, MD
araff@montefiore.org
718-828-6840
Modules: All
Maximum 3
First day students should report at 9AM to the Weiler 2nd floor Dialysis Unit and page the renal fellow to join the consult team. Please contact Olivia at 718-828-6840.



K511A  Cardiology (Jacobi Medical Center/Weiler Hospital)
A closely supervised experience with clinical and laboratory methods currently employed in the diagnosis and management of patients with cardiac disease of diverse etiology.  Participation is expected in daily attending consultation rounds, the CCU, a weekly cardiology specialty clinic and conferences.  This also provides an introduction to cardiac catheterization, angiography, pacing, and bedside monitoring. Major time is spent interpreting EKGs and arrhythmias with close faculty interaction.

Martin Cohen, MD
Morris Stampfer, MD, FACC
Contact: Ms. Kathy Varga, kathy.varga@nbhn.net, 718-918-5900 or 646-670-5120
All Modules
Maximum: 6 students 
First day student meet Room 5E2 - Jacobi Medical Center - 9:00 A.M.



K511C Cardiovascular Physiology & Pathophysiology (Weiler Hospital)
(Cardiac Catheterization and Echocardiography Laboratories) This rotation is a broad cardiology experience in the full range of cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology which present to the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory and clinical practice.  “See life as a cardiology fellow”.  Students attend CCU rounds four mornings of the week.  One morning of the week is spent in a cardiologist outpatient office experience.  Two afternoons per week are spent in the cardiac catheterization laboratory, two in the echocardiography suite.  Students will participate in the clinical care, imaging, cardiac catheterizations, and data analysis of patients who present with various diseases, including unstable coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, and congenital heart disease. Pre-procedural and post procedural examination of the patients will be part of the experience. They will be anticipated to achieve a sophisticated understanding of the cardiovascular principles which underlie the diseases seen and the therapies applied.  Students see patients in the daily coronary care unit rounds, where they will hear the clinical discussions of many of the patients who will come, or have come, to the catheterization laboratory and echocardiography laboratories.  In the outpatient session, they will see patients who have been through cardiac interventions.  This will give a rich experience in cardiovascular diseases, encompassing in-hospital and outpatient care.

Conferences to be attended:
Monday to Fridays: 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Cardiology Fellows’ Conferences

E. Scott Monrad, MD, smonrad@montefiore.org
Cynthia Taub, MD, ctaub@montefiore.org
718-904-3388
Modules: All, except 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B 
Maximum 1
First day student should meet in Cardiology Suite – Einstein Hospital - 9:00 AM



K512 Unified Gastroenterology/Liver Disease-East Campus (Jacobi Medical Center)
At both sites, students participate in all departmental functions under the direct supervision of a Gastroenterology Fellow and Attending. The student examines patients in the clinic and hospital and discusses patients with both Fellows and assigned attending physicians. Students participate in 16-20 hours of rounds and conferences per week including Research Seminars, GI-Pathology review, GI Radiology review, Journal Club, and Grand Rounds. Students are encouraged to attend and participate in all diagnostic and therapeutic procedures on their patients including diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopies (gastroscopy, ERCP, colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy), esophageal motility studies, and liver biopsies.

Douglas Simon, MD
718-918-5907
doug.simon@nbhn.net
Meet 7:45 A.M., G.I. Office, 2nd Floor, Endoscopy Suite, Jacobi Medical Center.
Modules: All
Maximum: 3



K513  Renal (Jacobi Medical Center)
The Renal rotation at Jacobi Medical Center offers the medical student a broad, in-depth introduction to Nephrology.  Jacobi cares for the underserved patients in the Bronx community, who often present with a highly diverse diagnoses of renal diseases.  As the population we serve has a much higher prevalence of renal disease the student will be exposed to a wide spectrum of renal diseases in the non-dialysis population, i.e. glomerular diseases, tubulointerstitial processes, obstructive uropathy and renal diseases in pregnancy.  As the incidence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) is extremely high in this population, they will learn to manage myriad complications of end stage renal disease and dialysis.  This rotation consists of caring for patients on the inpatient consult and dialysis service and attending the weekly outpatient renal clinic.  The student(s) will have the opportunity to attend all the weekly conferences, which include renal Grand Rounds, Journal Club and Case Conferences.  The student will be expected to present patients during teaching rounds and to participate in the critical discussion of patients on the renal service.  They will be introduced to the interpretation of renal biopsies.  This rotation emphasizes didactic teaching and practical management of renal patients in an academically nurturing environment.

Anjali Acharya, MD
 anjali.acharya@nbhn.net
718-918-7901
Modules: All
Maximum: 2
Where to report the first day of the elective or who to contact for that 6E 23B, Penny Roberts at 718-918-5643, penny.roberts@nbhn.net



K514 Nephrology (Montefiore Medical Center)
The student sees renal, electrolyte and hypertensive patients in consultation and presents the cases to the Renal Fellow and to the Renal Attending on Service at the Montefiore Hospital.  Attending rounds are made 5 days a week for two to four hours each session.  The student attends 1 Renal-Hypertension Clinic and 1 Transplantation clinic each week.  He/she also attends a weekly Journal Club, clinical conferences and Renal Grand Rounds.
Goals of elective:
1. To describe and explain the pathogenesis, differential diagnosis and treatment of Acute kidney injury (AKI) and Chronic kidney disease (CKD).
2. To recognize pathologic features in the urine microscopic exam
3. To list and explain the causes of glomerulonephritis (GN) and nephrotic syndrome (NS), and to describe the evaluation and treatment of
4. To list and explain the causes of secondary hypertension, and to describe the evaluation and treatment of secondary hypertension.
5. To describe the major transporters in the nephron and describe their role in acid-base and electrolyte disorders, (ie. potassium, magnesium, phosporous and sodium).
6. To describe the pathogenesis, histologic appearance and treatment of diabetic nephropathy and hypertensive nephrosclerosis.
7. To list and explain the types of renal replacement therapy, including hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and renal transplant.

Learning objectives:
-To list the causes of AKI
-To list the stages of CKD and their corresponding eGFRs
-To identify cells and casts in the urine sediment
-To list the secondary causes of GN and NS according to the presence/absence of immune complexes and the corresponding relevant serologic testing
-To list the causes of secondary HTN
-To illustrate the structure of the capillary loop and relevant cell types in the glomerulus
-To illustrate the relevant transporters in the nephron, including those in the nephron.
-To discuss water, acid-base, sodium and potassium handling along the nephron
-To discuss how HD and PD work

Learning experience:
The student is expected to function as a member of the consult team, which consists of a nephrology attending, fellow, and medicine resident.  This includes performing initial consults and daily follow-up on the student’s panel of patients, and attending daily rounds.  The student is also expected to attend the renal clinic on Wednesday afternoons (1-5pm), Medicine grand rounds on Thursdays (12:15-1:15pm), Renal grand rounds (Thursdays 5-6pm), Renal journal club on Friday mornings (8am), Renal clinical conference on Fridays (1-2pm).  In addition, the student is encouraged to attend any additional conferences that precede Renal grand rounds on Thursdays (4-5), including NephSAP review, Renal physiology, and Morbidity/mortality conference.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:
The nephrology attending will provide immediate feedback at points during and after the rotation verbally to the student, and complete the written evaluation provided by AECOM.

Suggested Textbook(s) information:
ISBN 0-7216-7072-5
Title: Fluid Electrolyte and Acid-Base Physiology
Edition: 3rd or later
Author: Halperin and Goldstein

ISBN 0-07-134682-1
Title: Clinical Physiology of acid-base and electrolyte disorders
Edition: 5th or later
Author: Burton Rose, Theodore Post

Michele Mokrzycki, MD
 718-920-5442
 mmokrzyc@montefiore.org
Modules: All
Maximum 4
On the first day students report to: 3411 Wayne Ave, Suite 5H, Renal Division 9am



K515 Unified Gastroenterology/Liver Disease-West Campus (MMC and NCB)
At both sites, students participate in all departmental functions under the direct supervision of a Gastroenterology Fellow and Attending. The student examines patients in the clinic and hospital and discusses patients with both Fellows and assigned attending physicians. Students participate in 16-20 hours of rounds and conferences per week including Research Seminars, GI-Pathology review, GI Radiology review, Journal Club, and Grand Rounds. Students are encouraged to attend and participate in all diagnostic and therapeutic procedures on their patients including diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopies (gastroscopy, ERCP, colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy), esophageal motility studies, and liver biopsies.

David Greenwald, MD, dgreenwa@montefiore.org or
Allan Wolkoff, MD, allan.wolkoff@einstein.yu.edu
718-920-4846  
Meet 7:45 A.M., Fellow's Conference Room
Modules: All
Maximum: 10



K516 Clinical Endocrinology (Montefiore Medical Center)
**Not Available to International Exchange Students**
The purpose of the elective is to provide clinical experience in-patient and out-patient Endocrinology accompanied by didactic instruction. The elective is full time. There are two similar programs, one on the East campus (K502) and one on the West campus (K516).   The outpatient component is the same in both electives.  The in-patient consultation service is similar but at different locations. The student will function as a member of the Department of Medicine Endocrinology Consultative Team, including medical residents and endocrinology fellows, to provide service to inpatients at one of two sites: 1) Jacobi Medical Center and Weiler Hospital or 2) Moses Division of Montefiore and North Central Bronx Hospital. Work rounds are held daily, and attending rounds occur generally three times weekly.  The student will have the opportunity to participate in the following clinics: 1. Monday Morning- CFCC Diabetes and Endocrinology Clinic; 2. Tuesday Afternoon- Jacobi Endocrinology Clinic; 3. Wednesday Morning- Reproductive Endocrinology Clinic; 4. Thursday Morning- Montefiore Diabetes clinic; 5. Friday Afternoon- Montefiore Endocrine Clinic. The student will have the opportunity to attend the following conferences:  1. Monday AM- Multidisciplinary Diabetes Conference (preceding CFCC Clinic); 2. Monday Afternoon- Endocrinology Fellows Conference (at Moses);  3. Thursday Morning- Diabetes Journal Club (preceding Montefiore Diabetes Clinic); 4. Friday Morning- Clinical Endocrinology Grand Rounds followed by Diabetes Research Center Conference.  It is expected that the student will develop familiarity with endocrine evaluation and a variety of endocrine diseases.  Emphasis on basic physiological concepts as related to endocrine disorders is stressed.  For further information, contact

Martin I. Surks, MD
Contact: Ms. Maritza Reyes, Program Supervisor, marreyes@montefiore.org, 718-920-2017
Modules: All
Maximum 2



K517  Cardiology (Montefiore Medical Center)
As part of the selected elective at Montefiore Einstein Center for Heart and Vascular Care the student is to report to the Cardiology Administrative Office, at 7:30am, located at the Foreman Pavilion, Silver Zone, at 111 East 210th Street.  There he/she will meet the on-call fellow - who will be the mentor for the duration of the elective.   As part of the Cardiology Elective Program, the student will be given an introduction to cardiology, emphasizing various aspects such as: physical examination, clinical evaluation and therapy, EKG sessions, as well as reviews of cardiac catheterization and echocardiograph studies.  He/she will participate on morning activities in the fellow’s Conference room, and other activities such as Cardiology Grand Rounds.   The student will also be provided temporary access to our care cast system.  (After student has been elected, a form will be provided for access).  Longer elective experiences can be arranged on an individual basis during which a student can become involved in clinical or laboratory research projects.

Robert Ostfeld, MD
Rostfeld@montefiore.org 
Contact: Ms. Carmen Vera, 718-920-4019, cvera@montefiore.org 
Modules:  All except 1B & 2A
Maximum 3



K518  Diabetes: Blood Sugar Normalization & Rehabilitation of the Whole Patient
(Mamaroneck, NY)
**Not Available to Visiting Students**
Students will participate in a private medical practice devoted exclusively to the treatment of diabetes and its complications. Patients of all ages will be seen. Participants will be trained in the most advanced methods for outpatient blood sugar normalization and weight control, as well as demonstrations of how to reverse diabetic complications. Topics to be covered include: patient training, intensive physical examination geared toward tracking diabetic complications, routine and research level laboratory studies, special diagnostic equipment, diet, self monitoring of blood glucose, exercise, intensive insulin therapy, selection and use of oral hypoglycemic agents, the use of new incretin mimetic agents to curb overeating and carbohydrate craving. Diagnosis and treatment of the following diabetic complications will be covered in depth: gastrointestinal motility disorders, autonomic neuropathies, peripheral vascular disease, dyslipidemia, foot ulcers, fungal infections, hypertension, retinopathy, cataracts, and erectile dysfunction.

Required textbook:
DIABETES SOLUTION, by Richard K. Bernstein, MD
ISBN: 987-0-316-18269-0

Edition: 2011

Cost: Free if picked up at the course site, $20.78 from Amazon, $12.74 in Kindle format

Richard K. Bernstein, MD
914-698-7525
md@diabetesscientist.com
Modules: All
Maximum: 3
Students must provide their own transportation to Mamaroneck, New York (15 miles north of AECOM). Buses run from the Bronx and trains from Fordham Station. First day of elective, meet at 9:00 a.m. - 1160 Greacen Point Road -Mamaroneck, New York (maps and transportation details are available from preceptor).



K519 Cardiology (Montefiore Medical Center-Wakefield)
The Cardiology rotation will provide the student with experience in the evaluation and treatment of cardiovascular problems.  This rotation will emphasize the approach to diagnosis and management of acute and chronic cardiac diseases, as well as management of risk factors for disease.  In addition, the rotation will emphasize the practice of primary care cardiology in medically underserved environment.  Learning goals focus on complete and accurate history and cardiovascular examination, ECG interpretation, indications for various invasive and noninvasive diagnostic studies, and understanding of first line medical therapy for common cardiac diseases.  This will provide them the opportunity to transition from didactic to integrated clinical evaluation and patient management.

At the end of the rotation the medical students should be able to: Obtain complete and accurate history pertinent to the differential diagnosis. Complete a pertinent physical examination for the evaluation of cardiovascular system distress and pertinent to the differential diagnosis. Distinguish normal from abnormal cardiovascular signs and symptoms. Formulating a differential diagnosis based on the findings from the history and physical examination. Describe information resources for determining diagnostic options for patients with cardiac problems. Demonstrate knowledge of the criteria for diagnosis of common cardiology problems. Approach ECG interpretation in a systematic and logical fashion. Demonstrate ability to evaluate and manage patients with the following conditions: Stable coronary syndromes, Cardiac dysrhythmias, Congestive heart failure, and Hypertension.  Know about common critical cardiac conditions. Recognize unstable patients in need of urgent evaluation and management. Know the first-line therapies for most common cardiac conditions. Recognize gaps in own knowledge; be self-directed at reading on those issues and initiating discussion of those topics with the team. Demonstrate professional responsibility in working as a team member with other members of the Cardiology Consult care team, patients and families. Provide compassionate and empathic patient care and be sensitive to the diverse factors affecting patients and their health care beliefs and needs including race, culture, income and ethnicity.

Basic structure of the day is to start with cardiology teaching sessions in the morning. Medical students are expected to attend Cardiology Teaching Conferences including cardiology grand rounds, journal clubs, morning reports, cardiology subspecialty lectures, etc every day 7:30-8:30 in one of Albert Einstein medical campuses.  The day following by visiting admitted patients, writing notes on them and meeting the teaching attending later in the day to discuss the cases with. The teaching attending will then round at the bedside with the team on each of these patients. The remainder of the day is spent performing new consultations, as assigned by the resident of attending.  Students will have the opportunity to read and interpret ECGs. In addition, students will be able to observe standard exercises stress testing, exercise stress imaging studies or pharmacologic stress testing, echocardiography.

The student is encouraged to feedback on a daily basis, but especially at the mid-point of the rotation by the cardiology attending. This will be an opportunity to address any issues from the student’s perspective. Upon completion of the rotation, the student will receive a written evaluation in accordance with the medical school policy.  This will be completed by the teaching attending responsible to oversee the clinical aspects of the rotation after discussion with any other attending, resident and cardiology fellow who worked directly with the student.

Richard Lucariello, MD
rilucari@montefiore.org
718-920-9256
Modules: All
Maximum: 4
First day of the rotation student should report to the Department of Cardiology at 9AM



K520 Hematology (Montefiore Medical Center)
The goal of this elective is to teach students the basic hematology that  is essential to all aspects of medicine. Students are assigned to the Consult Service at Montefiore and will see hospital consults with the Hematology Fellows and Consult Attending. In addition to daily Attending Rounds, students will attend two Hematology Clinics each week, a case-based thrombosis conference and red cell conference, morphology review of both bone marrows and blood smears and weekly teaching conferences with the Attendings.  There is an 8 am teaching conference every morning of the week.

Ellen Friedman, MD
elfriedm@montefiore.org
Contact: Ms. Tawana Alvarez taalvare@montefiore.org718-920-4137
Modules: All
Maximum 1
First day of elective students at Montefiore-1, 3411 Wayne Avenue, 8:00AM.



K521 Non-Invasive Methods in Cardiology (Montefiore Medical Center)
The student will work in the cardiac non-invasive laboratory learning those techniques of diagnosis that are performed there. Specifically the program will concentrate on echocardiography and stress testing.  Additional exposure to ECG interpretation, Holter monitoring, nuclear cardiology and CT coronary angiography will be available depending upon interest. Students are encouraged to join or initiate research projects.
Suggested textbook:
ISBN: 9780781795579
Cost: $200
Title: Feigenbaum's echocardiography
Edition: 7th
Author: William Armstrong and Tom Ryan

Daniel Spevack, MD (MMC), dspevack@montefiore.org, 718-920-4807
Cynthia Taub, MD (Weiler), ctaub@montefiore.org, 718-904-2779
Modules: All
Maximum: 1 student
On the first day of the elective, the student should report to the echo lab reading room at Weiler at 9 am.  It is located on the first floor of Weiler, in the non-invasive cardiology area.



K523 Pulmonary Medicine (Montefiore Medical Center)
The goal of this medical student elective is to introduce advanced medical student to the fundamentals of Pulmonary Medicine.  Students are assigned to a very busy consult service at Montefiore/Moses division and will see hospital consults with Pulmonary Fellows and Consults Attending.  In addition to daily Attending Rounds, students will attend weekly Pulmonary Clinics and multiple interdisciplinary conferences addressing diseases of the chest, including joint conferences with radiology, pathology, oncology, and thoracic surgery.  Pulmonary physiology, including performing and interpreting pulmonary function studies measuring mechanics, volumes, gas transfer and exchange and their use in disease diagnosis and management, will be part of the rotation.  Exposure to regulation of Ventilation/Sleep Medicine is integral to the rotation.  Students will also have the opportunity to observe and assist in Pulmonary Medicine procedures, including thoracentesis, fiberoptic bronchoscopy and related endo- and trans-bronchial procedures.

Thomas Aldrich, MD
 taldrich@montefiore.org 
718-920-6087
Contact: Ms. Lynette Bradberry, lbradber@montefiore.org, 718-920-6054
Modules: All
Maximum: 2



K524  Infectious Diseases (Montefiore Medical Center)
Adult patients with probable bacterial, viral, fungal, parasitic, or rickettsial diseases are evaluated and presented on rounds daily to the infectious disease fellow and attending physician for differential diagnosis, recommendations for basic and advanced microbiologic testing, therapeutic options, and discussion. Basic techniques of clinical microbiology learned during the second year course in Microbiology and Infectious Diseases are reviewed with particular reference to the patients seen. Students also attend seminars and combined Pediatric-Medicine Infectious Disease Grand Rounds. A highly useful elective no matter what field a student is considering for a career because nearly all types of physicians see patients with infections and use antibiotics.  Faculty: Drs. P. Alpert, J. Brust, J. Chan, R. Grossberg, L. Hanau, I. Leviton, G. Minamoto, V. Muggia, B. Ostrowsky, P. Nori, Y. Puius, P. Riska, N. Robbins, M. Slosar, J. Shuter, B. Zingman

Ira Leviton, MD
Contact: Ms. Angie Vega, avega@montefiore.org, 718-920-5438
Modules: All
Maximum: 2 students
On the first day student should report to 3411 Wayne Avenue, Suite 4H at 8:30 A.M.  Students should contact Ms. Angie Vega at least one day in advance to make sure that the fellows will be available at these times and to get the Grand Rounds and core curriculum lecture by e-mail.



K525  Rheumatology (Montefiore Medical Center)
Students attend arthritis rounds and see patients at the arthritis, lupus and juvenile arthritis clinics. They also attend conferences at the adult arthritis clinics, at Einstein and at Montefiore.  They consult on arthritis patients at Montefiore and observe at the clinical immunology laboratory.

 Clement Tagoe, MD
 ctagoe@montefiore.org
718-920-6661
Modules: All 
Maximum 2
First day meet 3411 Wayne Avenue Second Floor Rheumatology office, Montefiore Hospital,  at 9:00 A.M.



K526  Allergy & Immunology (Weiler Hospital)
A combined clinical/laboratory elective designed to teach the student the fundamentals of  diagnosis and treatment and research methods in allergy and immunology.  Students will directly participate in the care of patients in all of the hospital clinics and faculty practice locations of the Allergy Division and be exposed to a complete range of allergic and immunologic disorders.  Typical research projects include etiology and treatment of chronic urticaria, combined clinical and laboratory studies of asthma and sinusitis and primarily laboratory studies of basic immunological mechanisms underlying the development of allergic diseases.  The elective can be customized to the needs and wishes of individual students.

Measurable learning objectives of elective: Learn the fundamental principles of Allergy/Immunology diagnosis.  Learn how to treat asthma and allergic disorders.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Oral and written.

Suggested Textbook:
2010 Primer on Allergic and Immunologic Diseases. Journal of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Supplement;125 (#2): S1-S394, 2010

David L. Rosenstreich, MD
866-633-8255
 drosenst@montefiore.org
Modules: All 
Maximum: 2 Students
On the first day students contact Dr. Golda Hudes, golda.hudes@einstein.yu.edu or 866-633-8255, for correct location



K529  Pulmonary (Weiler Hospital)
This elective is based at the Weiler division of Montefiore Medical Center. The focus is on learning to provide consultation and continued care to patients with pulmonary problems in the inpatient and outpatient settings. The student will also participate in interpreting pulmonary function studies and conferences. There is the opportunity to observe and participate in procedures.

Jay Dobkin, MD
jdobkin@montefiore.org
718-904-2983 or 866-633-8255
Modules: All
Maximum: 1 student
On the first day of elective, the student is requested to come to the pulmonary office at Weiler - 2 South Room 28 at 9:00 A.M.



K530 Primary Care-Internal Medicine (Jacobi Medical Center)
The purpose of this senior elective is to expose students to the rewarding practice of general internal medicine.  The elective is centered at a busy, hospital-based adult primary care center providing care for a vastly diverse and medically complex patient population.  Students will see their own patients, working closely with Primary Care-Internal Medicine faculty at Albert Einstein College of Medicine (practicing general internists and faculty of the Department of Medicine) in a variety of clinical settings including general, as well as, subspecialty medical and non-medical clinics. Students may also participate in the home visit program- providing medical care to homebound patients who have no other access to care.  Other clinical opportunities will be arranged depending on the student's interests.  Students will participate in the clinical conferences with Primary Care-Internal Medicine residents and faculty.  Several case discussions and conferences are held each week focusing on important topics in Primary Care.

Eleanor Weinstein, MD
Eleanor.weinstein@nbhn.net
Contact: Ms. Janet Doxey, janet.doxey@nbhn.net, 718-918-4986
All Modules except 2A
Maximum 1 students
Students must contact Ms. Doxey or Dr. Weinstein prior to registration.



K532 Medical Oncology-West Campus (Montefiore Medical Center)
Educational Purpose and Goal: Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the US. Physicians must be familiar with the diagnosis and care of cancer patients. This rotation will prepare students to diagnose, evaluate, stage or treat patients with hematological malignancies, solid tumors, oncological and hematological emergencies, and to provide supportive/palliative care.  This is a 4 week rotation on the Moses oncology service under supervision of the assigned attending team.  Students will care for patients with solid tumors, hematologic malignancies, and hematopoetic stem cell transplant therapy.

Rasim Gucalp, MD
rgucalp@montefiore.org
718-920-5096
Modules: All
Maximum 3 students
First day of the elective, meet MMC-Hofheimer 1, 08:00A.M.


 

MED K533 Pulmonology (Maimonides Medical Center)
**NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS 
This is a four-week elective. The medical student will spend 4 weeks in the pulmonary division. The primary purpose of this elective is to provide the senior medical student with a diverse, well-rounded, meaningful, and focused exposure to the field of Pulmonary Medicine.

Measurable learning objectives:
Take a history, perform a physical examination and initiate a diagnostic work-up on patients with pulmonary problems including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, interstitial lung disease and a variety of infectious processes involving the lung.  State the indications for various diagnostic modalities including pulmonary function testing, arterial blood gases, thoracentesis, CT imaging of the chest, and bronchoscopy.  Interpret pulmonary function tests including spirometry, lung volumes and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide.  Interpret arterial blood gases. Interpret plain radiographs of the chest and formulate differential diagnoses for the relevant findings.  Interpret the results of pleural fluid analysis.  Explain the basic modes of mechanical ventilation choose appropriate initial ventilator settings for a patient and make appropriate adjustments in these settings based on changes in the patient’s condition.

Learning experience:
Inpatient Experience:  The 4th year medical student is an active member of the pulmonary consult team, along with an attending, and multiple pulmonary fellows. The student is expected to independently initiate a consult, which involves interviewing, and examining the patient, gathering relevant lab and radiographic data, formulating an initial plan and presenting the consult to the full fellow/attending physician team at afternoon rounds. He or she is also expected to do follow-up rounds on these patients and be able to give progress reports to the team on a daily basis. The student is expected to be present at all procedures on their patients, and will participate in appropriate procedures such as thoracentesis and central line insertion with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to participate in the pulmonary journal club and attend the various pulmonary division specialty conferences as discussed below.

Ambulatory Experience:  The Chest Clinic provides a unique exposure to common outpatient pulmonary issues such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary nodules, pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis and lung neoplasm. The student spends one half-day each week during the month in the pulmonary clinic. Students are expected to independently see a patient scheduled for that day. After interviewing and examining the patient, the student will review the case with an attending assigned to teaching that week.  The attending will review the history and physical exam and provide appropriate instruction relating to pertinent physical findings, such as decreased breath sounds, rales, etc. Relevant data such as Chest CT, PFT, laboratory results will be reviewed. The differential diagnosis, and appropriate diagnostic and treatment plan will be discussed. The goal will be to provide the student with an overview to the proper approach to the patient with pulmonary disease in the outpatient setting.

Didactic Lectures:  We believe strongly in the concept of didactic lectures as a supplement to clinical learning. Accordingly, students are both welcome and expected to attend these lectures during their elective month. Currently, there is a radiology conference every other Monday between 4-5pm, a general pulmonary didactic lecture series every Tuesday between 12-1pm, critical care lecture series every Thursday between 12-1pm, and a Journal Club every Friday between 12-1pm. We also have a daily PFT reading session with the Pulmonary Fellows. Students also are encouraged to continue attendance at Monday noon medical conference and Medical Grand Rounds in the Department of Medicine on Wednesday.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:
The students will be given a pre and post test to find out both their background understanding of the field of pulmonary medicine. The course director will review the post test answers and explanations with the students towards the end of the rotation and this will also serve as an important tool for self evaluation and growth during the elective. Students are evaluated on an ongoing basis informally by the attending, and deficiencies identified/rectified also are evaluated on an ongoing basis. In addition, attendings who have worked with the student are required to fill out official AECOM evaluation forms, which are filed in the student’s record. These evaluation forms are reviewed by the course director in conjunction with the student during the end of cycle feedback session.

Michael Bergman, MD
mibergman@maimonidesmed.org
Contact: Ms. Ainach Schneiderman, aschneiderman@maimonidesmed.org
718-283-7701
Maximum: 2
Modules: All
On the first day students report to: Ms. Anna Shneyderman, Student Coordinator, Pulmonary Division Office, 853 49th St, 5th floor, Room 511 at 930am.



K534 Nephrology (Maimonides Medical Center)
**NOT AVAILABLE FOR VISITING STUDENTS**
This elective is to provide an outstanding clinical training experience in nephrology commensurate with the level of training of a fourth year medical student.  It provides training in the physiology and pathophysiology of the kidney and its related disease entities and to understand how to apply this medical knowledge to patient care. To gain experience in the overall treatment of clinical disorders associated with fluid and electrolyte balance, intrinsic kidney disease, dialysis, hypertension, and intensive care nephropathy. Medical student will begin to learn the skills necessary to effectively communicate with patients, their families, physicians of various subspecialties, and non-physician healthcare workers. Students will acquire competence in obtaining a focused history and in performing a focused physical examination pertinent to renal related disorders, and to coherently and succinctly present these findings at renal rounds.

Learning objectives: By the end of the rotation students should be able to:
1. Recognize the diagnostic value and limitations of the urine sodium, fractional excretion of sodium, urine potassium, urine protein/ creatinine ratio, renal sonogram, renal cat scan, MRI, renal artery Doppler and renal nuclear imaging.
2. Calculate the creatinine clearance.
3. Describe the findings on urinalysis and microscopy in volume contraction, acute tubular necrosis and glomerulonephritis.
4. Classify the disorders that cause hyponatremia based on the patient’s volume status.
5. Differentiate the treatments of hyponatremia based on volume status, symptoms and acuteness of disease.
6. Classify the causes of hypokalemia based on the urinary potassium excretion, presence of hypertension, acid-base status and rennin/aldosterone levels.
7. Identify the clinical manifestations of hyperkalemia, including the electrocardiogram changes.
8. Describe the treatments of hyperkalemia and explain the criteria for each.
9. List the five most common medications that cause hyperkalemia.
10. Outline the causes of metabolic acidosis and alkalosis.
11. Interpret a patient’s acid base disorder based on the patient’s pH, pCo2 and bicarbonate levels.
12. Describe the secondary causes of hypertension, the appropriate diagnostic evaluation and treatment.
13. Classify acute kidney injury as pre-renal, post-renal and intrinsic renal disease.
14. Classify intrinsic renal disease as glomerular, tubulointerstitial or vascular disease.
15. List the most common causes of primary and secondary glomeruler diseases.
16. Recognize the natural history of diabetic nephropathy and the current treatments used to slow down it progression.
17. Employ an appropriate serologic evaluation for suspected glomerulonephritis.
18. Describe the renal extrarenal manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.
19. Describe the risk factors for contrast induced nephropathy and the interventions used to decrease its incidence and severity.
20. Explain the various types of renal replacement therapies used in the critical care setting, and the risks and benefits of each.
21. Explain the indications for dialysis in acute kidney injury and chronic progressive kidney disease.
22. List the classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD).
23. Describe the complications (and treatment) associated with CKD, including renal osteodystrophy and anemia.
24. Describe the benefits and complications of the various hemodialysis accesses including AV fistula, AV graft and tunneled catheters.

Schedule, Activities and Responsibilities:
8-9am: Tuesday- Didactic Lecture
9-10am: Preparation of new consults with renal residents and fellows. The student is responsible for obtaining the initial history and physical on an assigned consult. This is reviewed with the renal resident and fellow (who will go back to the patient and confirm pertinent parts of the history and physical).
12-1:30pm: (all day except Thursday) The student is responsible to prepare a differential diagnosis, diagnostic and therapeutic plan regarding the consult patient that he/she saw earlier that day.
12-1:30pm: Thursday- Didactic lectures and journal club with renal fellows, residents and students.
2-5pm: (all day except Wednesday) Renal attending rounds. The student will present the history, physical, differential diagnosis and therapeutic plan. The nephrology attending will then discuss the disease associated with this patient, and critique this presentation and plan.
1-5pm: Wednesday- Renal Clinic. The focus of this teaching experience will be to learn how to manage patients with renal related disorders in an ambulatory setting. The student will initially see the patient and perform a history and physical. The student will be given time to formulate a differential diagnosis, diagnostic and therapeutic plan. The student will then present these finding to the attending. The attending will then go back to the patient and review the essential part of the history and physical exam. The attending will then discuss the disease associated with this patient, and critique the student’s presentation.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:
The student feedback and evaluation will be both in “real time” and at the end of the rotation. the real time critique will occur immediately after the student presents the consult to the attending. The attending will discuss with the student, the quality of his/her history, physical examination and organization of his/her presentation. The attending will also discuss with the student the quality of his/her analysis of the diagnostic and treatment plans. At the end of the rotation the attending will give a written evaluation of the student. the program director will review this evaluation in person with the student. The written evaluation will include patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning and improvement, professionalism and system based learning. The program director will then ask the student for his/her assessment of his/her educational experience and for specific thoughts on how to improve the experience.


Sheldon Greenberg, MD
sgreenberg@maimonidesmed.org
(718) 283-7908 or (718) 757-6062
Student Coordinator: Mr. Charles Cruz, ccruz2@maimonidesmed.org, (718) 283-7908
Modules: All
Max: 2 Students
On the first day student report to: Mr. Charles Cruz, professional building, 953 49th Street, Brooklyn , NY 11219, 6th floor at 9AM.



K535 Cardiology (Maimonides Medical Center)
**NOT AVAILABLE FOR VISITING STUDENTS**
The Department of Cardiology has a busy clinical service as well as state-of-the art laboratories in the diagnostic and therapeutic cardiac disciplines. This provides the medical student with a wide variety of experiences in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular disease. The cardiovascular elective is open to fourth year medical students. The focus of the elective is on inpatient consultative cardiology, with exposure to the CCU environment, as well as the echo, nuclear, cardiac catheterization, and electrophysiology laboratories. 

Measurable learning objectives of elective:
-Apply clinical examination skills to diagnose congestive heart failure.
-Explain the principles behind management of acute coronary artery syndromes and describe various diagnostic tests in the workup and management of the patient with chest pain.
-Recognize ECG patterns of acute coronary artery syndromes.
-Understand the pathophysiology and management of common valvular heart diseases
-To list the different types of heart blocks and to be able to recognize them on an ECG
-To describe different types of atrial arrhythmias and options in their management
-To distinguish the difference between atrial and ventricular arrhythmias
-Discuss the use and limitations of noninvasive and invasive testing

Learning experiences:
Inpatient Experience:  The 4th year medical student is an active member of the Cardiology consult team, along with an attending, and multiple Cardiology fellows. The student is expected to independently initiate a consult, which involves interviewing and examining the patient, gathering relevant lab and radiographic data, formulating an initial plan and presenting the consult to the Cardiology fellow/attending physician team at afternoon rounds. He or she is also expected to do follow-up rounds on these patients and be able to give progress reports to the team on a daily basis. The student is expected to be present at all procedures on their patients. The student will also participate on Cardiac Intensive Care Unit rounds daily and observe cardiac diagnostic testing procedures such as echocardiography and stress testing, and therapeutic procedures in the cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology laboratories.

Ambulatory Experience:  The Cardiology Clinic provides a unique exposure to common outpatient cardiology issues such as Coronary artery disease, Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Atrial fibrillation, Supraventricular tachycardia, And Valvular Heart Disease. The student spends one half-day on Tuesdays  each week during the month in the Cardiology clinic. Students are expected to independently see a patient scheduled for that day. After interviewing and examining the patient, the student will review the case with an attending assigned to teaching that week.  The attending will review the history and physical exam and provide appropriate instruction relating to pertinent physical findings, such as heart sounds, murmurs, rubs, gallops, rales etc. Relevant data such as EKGs, Echocardiograms, Angiograms, laboratory results will be reviewed. The differential diagnosis, and appropriate diagnostic and treatment plan will be discussed. The goal will be to provide the student with an overview to the proper approach to the patient with cardiac disease in the outpatient setting.

Didactic Experience:  We believe strongly in the concept of didactic lectures as a supplement to clinical learning. Accordingly, students are both welcome and expected to attend these lectures during their elective month. These are the list of current Cardiology conferences that the student will be expected to attend during the elective:  EKG conference (Mondays Noon), Electrophysiology Conference (Tuesdays 8:30AM), Echocardiography Conference (Tuesday Noon), Cardiac Catheterization Conference (Wednesdays 8AM), Journal Club (Thursday 8AM), General Cardiology Didactic Lecture Series (Thursdays 4PM), Interventional Cardiology Conference (Friday 8AM). They are also encouraged to attend the Dept of Medicine Noon conferences daily as long as it does not conflict with the Cardiology conferences.

Method of student feedback and evaluation: The students will be informally evaluated on an ongoing basis by the attending and the cardiology fellow. The student’s clinical cardiology skills, including history taking, physical examination, and ability to synthesize data and formulate a plan will be evaluated.  Students are evaluated on an ongoing basis informally by the attending, and deficiencies identified/rectified also are evaluated on an ongoing basis. In addition, attendings who have worked with the student are required to fill out official AECOM evaluation forms, which are filed in the student’s record. These evaluation forms are reviewed by the course director in conjunction with the student during the end of cycle feedback session.

Felix Yang, MD
fyang@maimonidesmed.org
(718) 283-6667
Student Coordinator: Ms. Griziella Mannino, gmannino@maimonidesmed.org, (718) 283-6892
Modules: All
Max: 3 students
On first day students report to: 4802 10th Av, 4th floor, Dept of Cardiology: Fellowship and student Coordinator, Ms. Graziella Mannino’s office; at 9:30 AM.  This will be followed by an orientation with Dr. Yang, during which he will review the learning objectives, inpatient and ambulatory responsibilities, and lecture schedule.



K536 Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender Healthcare (Multiple Sites)
**This elective is personalized to each student’s academic goals and therefore the student must contact the Course Director no less than 3 months prior to a start date to allow an enriched learning experience**
This elective will provide the senior medical student with a diverse, meaningful, and focused exposure to the healthcare needs of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) patients.  Areas of study include identity, life cycle, bias, disparities, legal discrimination, violence, health promotion, harm reduction, prevention, and clinical practice. Learning goals focus on cultural as well as clinical competence in the care of the LGBT patient, and include a requirement for an educational, service or research activity pertaining to LGBT healthcare.

Learning objectives:
-Describe specific healthcare needs of LGBT patients;
-List challenges faced by LGBT patients in accessing health care and identify ways to overcome these challenges;
-List local and national resources for LGBT patients
-Identify and develop a skill(s) to engage in LGBT-related research, teaching and/or service.

Learning experience:  The elective will have three core components: clinical, didactic, and an LGBT-related project. While all components are required, the percentage of each will be tailored by the student’s preferences. These preferences will be determined via a pre-elective form which asks the student to state his/her goals for the elective and the ways in which s/he would like to achieve them.  Because of the personalized nature of this elective, we ask that the student contact the course director for pre-approval at least 3 months prior to the start of the elective in order for the course director to coordinate with other faculty members.

Clinical: Students will have up to four outpatient clinical sessions a week during which they will see patients under supervision at community based organizations such as the South Bronx Community Health Center (SBCHC), the Montefiore MMG Health Care Centers (CFCC and CHCC) , and the Callen-Lorde Community Health Center (CLCHC, an LGBT health center in Manhattan). They will also have an opportunity to go out on several Homeless Youth Outreach Mobile Vans (Streetworks at SBCHC or HOTT at CLCHC). Students will keep a narrative journal of their experiences which will be reviewed with the medical director weekly.

Didactic: Students will have weekly required readings and educational videos. They will also be required to attend at least one resident-level LGBT educational seminar led by faculty from a variety of disciplines (e.g. internal medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, ob-gyn, emergency medicine). These are offered regularly at varying times throughout the month and will be chosen based on the student’s preference and availability.

Educational / Research / Service Project: Students will be required to engage in at least one LGBT-related research, educational, or service-related activity of their choice. Examples of prior and current educational projects include: creating or refining teaching presentations within various disciplines (i.e., updating references for existing workshops);  developing and evaluating the Safe Zone Ally and Mentoring Workshops for the medical community; helping to run a Safe Zone Workshop; creating an educational video; updating a local resource guide; assisting  in developing LGBT curriculum for the medical school (e.g. helping to develop LGBT case scenarios that can be substituted into any course instead of  an existing example); writing an article for the quarterly Einstein LGBT Bulletin; doing research in social media; and helping to organize the LGBT Health Workforce Conference (annual event).  In addition, the student will be required to attend monthly LGBT Einstein Steering Committee meetings, at which time s/he will be able to meet and network with LGBT faculty, students, staff, and supportive allies; and also learn about the steps for advancing LGBT policy, practice, and academic scholarship at Einstein.  There will be an optional component for students to spend one day a week with a self-indentified LGBT faculty member in the field of the student’s choice.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:  Students will meet at the onset of the course and then weekly with the course director to monitor the progress of the student in meeting his/her personal goals as well as the formal course requirements. Specifically, the course director will 1) review the student’s clinical activities of the previous week, including a discussion of the narrative journal entries; 2) learn about the progress of the research / educational/service-related project; and 3) confirm the plans for the future week.  The course director will complete an official Einstein evaluation that will be based on 1) the student’s motivation and initiative; 2) feedback from the individual faculty members who work directly with the student at the clinical site and during the scholarship work; and 3) the results of a formal exam to assess knowledge learned about best practices regarding the healthcare of LGBT patients.

Lisa Reeves, MD
lreeves@montefiore.org
718-405-8040
Modules: All (Restricted Registration)
Max: 1 student
On the first day students report to: Dr. Reeves at Comprehensive Family Care Center, 1621 Eastchester Road, Suite 215, Bronx; Time: TBA



K537 Hematology/Oncology (Maimonides Cancer Center, Maimonides Medical Center)
**NOT AVAILABLE FOR VISITING STUDENTS**
Students will spend two weeks with the inpatient Hematology/Oncology consult service and two weeks seeing outpatients at the Maimonides Cancer Center. On the consult service, students will perform consultations for other services under the direction of the Fellow and will present cases to the Attending. Experiences will include evaluation and management of hematologic and oncologic emergencies, observation of bone marrow aspirations and interpretation of peripheral blood smears. During time spent at the Cancer Center the student will work directly with an Attending in his or her outpatient practice seeing newly diagnosed and established patients with cancer and hematologic disorders. The student will attend various tumor board meetings with a focus on the multi-disciplinary management of patients with cancer.

Learning objectives:
-Describe the typical clinical presentations, clinical courses, and complications for the most common cancers (e.g. colorectal, lung, breast, and prostate).
-Describe, in general, the process of staging the most common cancers and discuss the role of staging in treatment planning and assessing prognosis.
-Describe the interdisciplinary nature of cancer treatment, including the role of oncologic surgeons, radiation therapists, social services, palliative care teams, and hospice agencies.
-Explain the rationale, mechanism of action and general role of the different classes of systemic therapy (cytotoxic chemotherapy, targeted therapy, biologic therapy and hormonal therapy) in the care of cancer patients.
-Identify common complications of cancer therapy including neutropenic fever, stomatitis, nausea/vomiting, and tumor lysis syndrome and describe their clinical management.
-Demonstrate a basic approach to interpretation of iron studies, peripheral smears and bone marrow aspirates, hemoglobin electrophoresis, mixing studies and clotting assays, protein electrophoresis.
-Become comfortable discussing prognosis and end of life issues with patients diagnosed with terminal illnesses.

Learning experience: The student will rotate on the inpatient consult service for two weeks where they will perform initial consultations and present cases to the service attending. The student will communicate recommendations with the primary team. Students will be expected to follow their patients’ progress throughout hospitalization and aide in facilitating the transition to outpatient care when appropriate. The second two weeks will be spent seeing outpatients in the attending’s office hours at the cancer center. The student will take histories and perform physical exams and report findings to the attending. The student will attend numerous tumor board and case conferences each week and will present at least one case to the tumor board for discussion. There is no evening or weekend call.

Conference Schedule:
Monday: 9:00-10:00 Biopsychosocial Rounds

Tuesday: 9:00-11:00 Breast Tumor Board

Wednesday:
Maimonides Cancer Center
8:00-9:00 Genitourinary Tumor Board (2nd , 3rd and 4th Wednesdays of the month)
1:00-2:30 Heme/Onc Grand Rounds

Thursday:
Maimonides Cancer Center
8:00-9:00 Case management conference
12:00-1:00 Thoracic Tumor Board

Friday: 8:00-9:00 Hematologic Malignancy Tumor Board (1st and 3rd Fridays of the month)

Method of student feedback and evaluation: Students will meet with the course director at the end of the rotation for verbal feedback and will receive a written evaluation.

Kevin Becker, MD
718-765-2613
kbecker@maimonidesmed.org
Max: 4 students
Modules: All
On the first day students report to:  Maimonides Cancer Center (6300 Eighth Ave), First floor conference room at 8:00am



K538 Infectious Diseases (Maimonides Medical Center)
**Not Available to Visiting Students**
This is a four-week elective in the Division of Infectious Diseases. This will provide the medical students exposure to a large variety of inpatient infectious diseases, as well as exposure to a busy HIV outpatient practice.

Learning objectives: After completing this elective, the medical students will:
-Outline the clinical presentation of common infectious diseases;
-Select appropriate empiric antibiotics for hospitalized patients;
-Explain the mechanisms of Gram-negative resistance;
-Explain the mechanisms of Gram-positive resistance;
-Recognize the indications for starting antiretroviral medications;
-Identify the indications for starting and stopping opportunistic infections prophylaxis in HIV infected patients.
-Describe the principles of antibiotic stewardship.

Learning experiences:
Inpatient Experience:  All consultations requested are treated as teaching cases. Medical students will perform a history and physical examination; formulate a differential diagnosis, and diagnostic and treatment plan. Patients are presented each afternoon during attending rounds. Every patient is seen with the attending, and salient aspects of the history and physical examination are reviewed. The recommendations are discussed with the house staff and the physician requesting the consultation. When invasive diagnostic procedures are performed, the slides are reviewed with a pathologist during rounds. Culture and Gram stain results are reviewed with the microbiology technicians, as well as with the Director of the Microbiology Laboratory. During rounds, the medical students are exposed to the multiple aspects of an antibiotic stewardship program.
Ambulatory experience:  The Life Forward Program (HIV Program) sees patients twice a week. The medical students will see HIV patients with an Infectious Diseases fellow, attending, and Infectious Diseases pharmacist and discuss relevant aspects of HIV care.  General Infectious Diseases Clinic meets once a week for a half-day. A variety of conditions are seen with the assigned Infectious Diseases attending and fellow.
Didactic experience:  The medical students must attend the Infectious Diseases Division Case Conference, Journal Club and Didactic Conferences, held on Tuesdays 9-11.30 AM, as well as the Department of Medicine Noon Conferences and Grand Rounds.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:  As medical students interact one-to-one on a daily basis with fellows and attendings, feedback is given on a regular basis during these daily interactions. In additional, attendings who have worked with the student are required to fill out AECOM evaluation forms, which are filed in the student’s record. These evaluation forms are reviewed by the course director in conjunction with the student during the end of cycle feedback session.

Monica Ghitan, MD
718-283-6017
mghitan@maimonidesmed.org
Maximum 3 students
Modules:All
On the first day, students report to Geraldine Rich’s office at 4719 Fort Hamilton Parkway, Brooklyn, NY 11219 at 9:30 AM.



K540  Cardiology (Bronx-Lebanon Hospital)
Students will experience all phases of clinical cardiology with emphasis on bedside evaluation and interpretation of all the laboratory methods presently used in the diagnosis and management of patients with cardiac problems. Students will participate in clinical rounds and attend all the cardiology conferences. They will actively participate in the clinical assessment of the status of patients with cardiac disease, and will be individually supervised in reviewing the clinical data as well as reading electrocardiograms and holters, echocardiograms, stress testing, pacemaker evaluation and hemodynamic data obtained in the catheterization laboratory.

Jonathan N. Bella, MD
jbella@bronxleb.org
718-518-5222
Modules: All
Maximum 2
First day meet 12th floor Concourse Division.



K542 HIV/AIDS Medicine (Bronx Lebanon Hospital)
The course is designed to provide students with a broad and closely supervised exposure to HIV/AIDS medicine.  Students will spend much of their time on the 32 bed dedicated AIDS ward, where they will have exposure to many of the acute and chronic problems related to HIV, associated opportunistic infections and illnesses and complications of therapy.  In addition, they will participate, under the supervision of ID and HIV specialists, in the ambulatory management of HIV/AIDS.  Opportunities for home visits, rotations in HIV residential facilities and exposure to counseling and testing and clinical trials exist depending on the interests of the student.

Richard B. Cindrich, MD
rcindric@bronxleb.org
718-960-1293
Modules: All
Max: 1 student
Contact course director prior to registration regarding time periods and availability.



K543  Nephrology (Bronx Lebanon Hospital)
Combined clinical and laboratory nephrology. Clinic and in-patient activities. Biopsy studies. Dialysis. Research opportunity available for a student able to devote a longer period of time.

Mahendraray B. Dave, MD
 drdave48@hotmail.com
718-518-5323
Modules: All
Maximum: 1 Student 
First day student to meet Dialysis Unit, 10th floor, Concourse Division - 9:00 A.M.



K545 Chest Medicine (Bronx Lebanon Hospital)
Students will see patients with pulmonary problems from all services at Bronx Lebanon under close supervision of the fellows and faculty in the pulmonary division. Experience in all aspects of clinical pulmonary medicine is offered.

Learning objectives: Able to read basic radiology, able to interprets basics symptoms and signs of pulmonary diseases
Learning experience: Daily pulmonary morning lectures from 7:30 to 9 AM, round in floor with pulmonary consultation team, twice a week meeting to read pulmonary function test. Attendance to pulmonary ambulatory clinic. Option to attend performance of bronchoscopies
Method of student feedback and evaluation: Verbal and written feedback

Gilda Dinz-Fuentes, MD
718-466-8160
gfuentes@bronxleb.org
Modules 1B, 2B, 3A, 3B, 4B, 5A and 6B ONLY
Maximum 2
On first day students should report to 10 floor Milstein Building at Bronx Lebanon at 8:00 A.M.



K546 Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine (Jacobi Medical Center)
Students who choose this elective will see patients on the Chest Medicine service, Pulmonary Consultation service, Critical Care Medicine Consultation service, and the Medical Intensive Care Unit at Jacobi Medical Center. This is an opportunity to learn about in-depth various Pulmonary and Critical Care problems that present both classically or unusually. On the Chest Medicine Service or MICU, students will join the team for Attending rounds in the morning. Radiology conference takes place three times each week at 11am where the imaging is reviewed with a Radiology attending and resident. On the Consultation services, students will see patients either independently or with the PCCM fellows and Internal Medicine resident(s) who may be taking the elective as well. The Consult Attending will round during different times of the day depending on the acuity of the patients. Chest Clinic takes place Wednesday afternoons and Friday mornings where fellows and Attendings see their follow-ups or new patients referred by Primary Care, other specialties, or the ED. Students may see OPD patients independently or in conjunction with a fellow or Attending. Students will be expected to attend any Divisional Conferences being given during their time on the elective. Pulmonary Function Tests will be interpreted with the fellow or Attending. Finally, students will have opportunities to observe procedures done by the fellow/resident with Attendings supervising.

Virginia Chung, MD
Virginia.chung@nbhn.net
718-918-4505
Modules: All
Maximum : 1 student
First day report to Bldg # 1, 5N50 at 8:30am.



K608 Critical Care (Montefiore Medical Center)
The primary purpose of this elective is to provide the senior medical student with a diverse, well-rounded, meaningful, and focused exposure to the field of Critical Care Medicine.  The student will be exposed to our Consult Service as part of our "ICU without walls" (providing critical care outside the ICU), and learn how critical care triage decisions are made.  They will spend time in our Medical ICU, the classic critical care environment, and get an exciting opportunity to rotate through our non-medical intensive care units:  the Surgical ICU, where critically ill neurosurgical and general surgical/liver transplant patients are cared for, as well as the Cardiac Surgical ICU, where patients are cared for after cardiac surgery.  Over the course of the month, the co-directors will be providing weekly small group lectures on the following topics: Advanced Cardiac Life Support, shock/multiple organ failure, respiratory failure/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, acid-base issues, mechanical ventilation/ventilator weaning, as well as sedation in the ICU, oxygen delivery equations, and hemodynamic monitoring.  In addition, the students will be taught about national critical care patient safety initiatives, such as the Institute for Healthcare Improvement ventilator associated pneumonia bundle, central line bundle, and the surviving sepsis campaign guidelines.  Students will be invited to attend our morning report, educational noon conferences for the fellows, and our Critical Care Journal Club (in addition to medicine and surgical grand rounds).  Medical students will attend daily work rounds, follow one or two patients closely each week, learn how to present critically ill patients on rounds, perform relevant literature searches, and learn fundamental cardiovascular and pulmonary pathophysiology as it relates to the critically ill or injured patient. They will also learn the indications for and techniques of various procedures in the ICU.  By the end of the elective, medical students should have developed a broader perspective on what it means to manage a critically ill patient, improved their ability to recognize in which patients critical care is most likely to be helpful (and, conversely, when critical care should perhaps not be provided), as well as enhanced their knowledge of end-of-life issues as they relate to the critically ill patient. They should learn about (and temporarily become part of) the multidisciplinary critical care team, and discover the crucial role of that team in providing high-quality critical care. They will learn the challenges and rewards of a career in Critical Care Medicine.  Goals of Rotation:  Learn a thoughtful and organized approach to ICU patients; Gain experience with interpretation of ICU patient data.  Improve their understanding of common ICU problems such as invasive monitoring, mechanical ventilation, sedation, sepsis, ARDS;  Enhance their knowledge of the cardiovascular and pulmonary pathophysiology pertinent to the ICU; Learn to write initial orders for mechanical ventilator support and sedation; Learn the rationale for commonly used ICU protocols such as ARDS ventilator management, insulin drips, weaning from ventilatory support, fast-track extubation after cardiac surgery; Become familiar with some of the important clinical trials in critical care medicine, and the impact of evidence-based medicine on current ICU patient management.  This will be a 4-week elective, and will be located at the Moses Campus of Montefiore Medical Center.  The medical student's time will be allocated as follows: one week on the Critical Care Consult service working with the consult fellow and attending; one week in the Medical ICU at Moses; one week in the Surgical ICU at Moses; one week in the Cardiac Surgical ICU at Moses.  The duration of time that a student spends in each unit may be modified after discussion between the student and one of the course co-directors. The medical students will meet at 8 am on the first day of the elective in the Critical Care Administration area, Gold Zone.  Student Evaluations: We will be distributing a pre-test at the beginning of the course, and a post-test at the end.  Please see course description and goals and objectives for more detail as to our expectations.  In addition, students will be receiving real-time feedback during the course, as well as exit interviews from one of the course co-directors.

Recommended textbooks:
The ICU Book, 3rd edition, by Paul R. Marino, 2006, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Critical Care Secrets, 4th edition, Parsons/Wiener-Kronish, 2007, Mosby. In addition, students will be provided key critical care references from the past decade or so in the field of critical care medicine. They will also be distributed the Society of Critical Care Medicine "Medical Student's Guide to Intensive Care Medicine" PDF document.

Anthony Carlese, MD 718-920-5440, acarlese@montefiore.org
Ariel Shiloh, MD 718-920-5440, ashiloh@montefiore.org
Contact: Ms. Ledina Knight, leknight@montefiore.org, 718-904-3015
Modules: All
Maximum: 4



K609 Critical Care (Maimonides Medical Center)
**NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS
This is a four-week elective. The medical student will spend 2 weeks in the Surgical ICU and 2 weeks in the Medical ICU. The primary purpose of this elective is to provide the senior medical student with a diverse, well-rounded, meaningful, and focused exposure to the field of Critical Care Medicine. The student will develop an understanding (and become part) of the multidisciplinary critical care team.  The student will gain an appreciation of the challenges and rewards of a career in critical care medicine.

Learning objectives: 
By the end of the elective, the medical student will be able to:
Recognize in which patients’ critical care is most likely to be helpful (and conversely, when critical care should perhaps not be provided). Interpret basic ICU patient data.  Discuss aspects of cardiovascular and pulmonary pathophysiology pertinent to the ICU, as well as fluid resuscitation and management, as well as take part in and become more facile with family communication. Write initial orders for ventilator management, insulin continuous infusions, liberation from ventilatory support. Explain important pharmacotherapeutic issues in the ICU. Report on some of the important clinical trials in critical care medicine and the impact of EBM on ICU patient management. Discuss end-of-life issues as they relate to the critically ill patient.

Learning experience:
The students will spend 2 weeks in our 12-bed surgical ICU (caring for general surgical and neurosurgical patients), and 2 weeks in our 20-bed Medical ICU, caring for patients with medical critical illness.  Over the course of the month, the course director will be providing weekly small group educational sessions on the following topics:  advanced cardiac life support, shock/multiple organ failure, as well as sedation in the ICU, oxygen delivery equations, and hemodynamic monitoring.  In addition, the students will be taught about national critical care patient safety initiatives, such as the Institute for Healthcare Improvement ventilator associated pneumonia bundle, central line bundle, as well as the surviving sepsis campaign 3 hour and 6 hour sepsis bundles.  (Patient safety bundles are a small straightforward set of evidence-based practices that, when performed collectively and reliably, have been proven to improve patient outcomes.) They will also work closely with and receive lectures from our clinical pharmacist. Students will attend the educational noon conferences for the critical care fellows, as well as weekly critical care journal club (in addition to medical and surgical grand rounds).  These conferences are all held on a weekly basis.  Their experience will strike a balance between didactics and ward experience.

Method of student feedback and evaluation:
The students will be given a pre and post test to find out both their background understanding of the field of critical care medicine; in addition, this pre/post test should serve as some documentation of their improvement in the understanding of basic pathophysiology of the critically ill patient.  In addition, the students will be receiving real-time feedback during the course from the course director, as well as an exit interview from the course director.  The director will be able to be reached throughout the course by the students should any issues come up. The course director will complete the final evaluation form based on direct interaction with the student.

Housing may be available upon request.

Recommended reading:
The ICU book, 4th edition, Paul R. Marino, 2013.
Critical Care secrets, 5th edition, Parsons/Wiener-Kronish, 2013.

Richard Savel, MD, rsavel@maimonidesmed.org
Yizhak Kupfer, MD, ykupfer@maimonidesmed.org
Contact: Ms. Tina Marshall, 718-283-7629, tmarshall@maimonidesmed.org
Maximum: 2 students
Modules: All
On the first day students report to: at 9am to Ms. Tina Marshall, 903 49th Street, 2nd Floor, Brooklyn, NY



 

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