Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP)

Medical Scientist Training Program

Featured Student

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Ian Baine

I chose Einstein because its program challenges me in unique ways while accommodating my individual needs. And with such a friendly and active student body, Einstein's MSTP is not only a wonderful place to learn science and medicine, you'll have fun here too and make great friends.

 

The Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein) is one of the nation’s oldest. From the start, our goal has been to train a diverse group of outstanding students to become future leaders of academic medicine and medical research. Continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health since 1964, the Einstein MSTP has 464 illustrious Alumni with careers spanning the spectrum from basic science research to clinical medicine and many variations in between.

Today, the Einstein MSTP is still unique. Larger than most other MSTPs, it fosters a strong academic and social community within the college. While large enough to be an independent academic unit, the program is still small enough to provide students with the individual attention their unique careers require.

The current training program recognizes that the successful physician-scientist training is not simply medical school plus graduate training. The program integrates MSTP-specific courses with medical and graduate courses, during the first two years of preclinical course work. Integration continues in the PhD thesis years through weekly involvement in the MSTP Continuity Clinic and monthly Clinical Pathological Conferences and MSTP Career Paths seminars.

Students have outstanding publications and residency placements.

The Einstein MSTP encourages applications from all individuals. As stated in the College's Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan for Excellence, "At Einstein, we value all people and perspectives that make us unique and increase our diversity at large. Albert Einstein College of Medicine reaffirms its commitment to recruiting, retaining and advancing individuals from historically underrepresented and marginalized minority groups in the scientific and medical professions. At the College of Medicine, this includes, (in no particular order, and is not limited to) women, individuals who are black, Latino/Latina; Pacific Islander or indigenous Americans; individuals from new immigrant populations; individuals with both apparent and nonapparent disabilities; all sexual and gender minorities, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, asexual and queer people as well as transgender, gender-nonconforming and intersex individuals; religious minorities and individuals from economically disadvantaged backgrounds."

Four M.D./Ph.D. students share what motivates them to pursue the long and rigorous course to become physician-scientists.  

Awards & Accomplishments

  • Meera Trivedi NIH NRSA F31 Fellowship for a project entitled "Characterizing Novel Regulations of Dendritic Tiling in C. elegans" (Sponsor, Hannes Buelow, Neuroscience)
  • Jamie Moore NIH NRSA F31 Fellowship for a project entitled "Unraveling Mechanisms of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Priming by CD169+ Macrophages in Severe Murine Malaria" (Sponsor, Gregoire Lauvau, Microbiology & Immunology)
  • Adam Spitz NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Direct Small Molecule Activation of Pro-apoptotic BAK" (Sponsor, Evris Gavathiotis, Biochemistry)
  • Hayden Hatch NIH NRSA F31 Fellowship for a project entitled "Transcriptional regulation, neuronal development, and function of the mushroom body in a Drosophila model of intellectual disability" (Co-Sponsors, Julie Secombe and Nicholas Baker, Neuroscience/Genetics)
  • Erik Hasenoehrl NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Targeting terminal respiratory oxidation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A novel investigation of Cytochrome bd oxidase function" (Co-Sponsors, Michael Berney & William Jacobs, Microbiology & Immunology)
  • Joshua Mayoral NIH NRSA F31 Fellowship for a project entitled "Secreted effectors of Toxoplasma gondii bradyzoites" (Sponsor, Louis Weiss, Pathology)
  • Joshua Weinreb NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Uncovering the Role of the DEAD Box Helicase Ddx41 in Hematopoiesis" (Sponsor, Teresa Bowman, Developmental & Molecular Biology)
  • Rosiris Leon-Rivera NIH NRSA F31 Fellowship for a project entitled "Molecular Mechanisms of Increased Risk of Racial and Ethnic Minorities for HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders" (Sponsor, Joan Berman, Pathology)
  • Todd Rubin NIH NRSA F31 Fellowship for a project entitled "Examining sex as a predictor of outcomes across multiple levels of head trauma" (Sponsor, Michael Lipton, Neuroscience)
  • Niloy Iqbal NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Tumor Suppressor pRb is a Novel Target for Hypothalamic Inhibition of Diet Induced Obesity" (Sponsors, Liang Zhu and Streamson Chua, Jr., Developmental & Molecular Biology)
  • Kristin Palarz NIH NRSA F31 Fellowship for a project entitled "Serotoninergic modulation of cerebellar circuitry" (Sponsor, Kamran Khodakhah, Neuroscience)
  • Peter John NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "B7x in Cancer: Mechanisms and Therapies" (Sponsor, XingXing Zang, Microbiology & Immunology)
  • Richard Piszczatowski NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Investigating the role of Nol3 in normal and malignant hematopoiesis" (Sponsor, Ulrich Steidl, Cell Biology)
  • Liane Hunter NIH NRSA F31 Fellowship for a project entitled "Identifying Biomarkers that Modify Outcomes in Soccer Heading" (Sponsor, Michael Lipton, PhD in Clinical Investigation)
  • Justin Wheat NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Uncovering Transcriptional Regulation of a Master Hematopoietic Transcription Factor at Single Molecule Resolution" (Sponsor, Ulrich Steidl & Robert Singer, Cell Biology and Anatomy & Structural Biology)
  • Jeet Biswas NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "The sequence recognition, structure and function of the IMP family of mRNA binding proteins" (Sponsor, Robert Singer, Anatomy & Structural Biology)
  • Sean Healton NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Epigenetic activity of normal and cancer-associated mutant H1 linker histones" (Sponsor, Arthur Skolutchi, Cell Biology)
  • Cary Weiss NIH NRSA F30 Individual for a project entitled "MicroRNA-22 and the microRNA-22/tet2 network as regulators of the cell fate decision in hematopoietic stem cells and in the development of myelodysplastic syndrome" (Sponsor, Keisuke Ito, Cell Biology)
  • Ruth Howe, NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Characterizing the Novel Protein C15ORF65" (Sponsor,  Ulrich Steidl, Cell Biology)
  • Marika Osterbur, NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Extra-coding features of mRNA are essential for hERG channel function" (Sponsor, Thomas McDonald, Molecular Pharmacology)
  • Karin Skalina, NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Optimization of non-ablative focused ultrasound therapy for tumor immunity" (Sponsor, Chandan Guha, Pathology)
  • Michael Willcockson, NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Regulators of the erythroid terminal differentiation decision and their connection to the cell cycle" (Sponsor, Art Skoultchi, Cell Biology)
  • Nelson Gil, NIH NRSA F31 Fellowship for a project entitled "The molecular basis of receptor-ligand recognition on the immunological synapse" (Sponsor, Andras Fiser, Systems & Computational Biology)

 more awards 

Publications

  • publications Gil N, Fajardo EJ, Fiser A. Discovery of Receptor-Ligand Interfaces in the Immunoglobulin Superfamily. Proteins. 2019 Jul 12.
  • publications Fels JM, Spence JS, Bortz RH 3rd, Bornholdt ZA, Chandran K. A Hyperstabilizing Mutation in the Base of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Acts at Multiple Steps To Abrogate Viral Entry. MBio. 2019 Jul 9; 10(4).
  • publications Piqué DG, Andriani GA, Maggi E, Zimmerman SE, Greally JM, Montagna C, Mar JC. Aneuvis: web-based exploration of numerical chromosomal variation in single cells. BMC Bioinformatics. 2019 Jun 17
  • publications Piszczatowski RT, Steidl U. Aurora Kinase A inhibition: A mega-hit for myelofibrosis therapy? Clin Cancer Res. 2019 Jun 13.
  • publications Stock AD, Der E, Gelb S, Huang M, Weidenheim K, Ben-Zvi A, Putterman C. Tertiary lymphoid structures in the choroid plexus in neuropsychiatric lupus. JCI Insight. 2019 Jun 6.
  • publications Brace KM, Lee WW, Cole PD, Sussman ES. Childhood leukemia survivors exhibit deficiencies in sensory and cognitive processes, as reflected by event-related brain potentials after completion of curative chemotherapy: A preliminary investigation. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2019 Jun.
  • publications Rubin TG, Lipton ML. Sex Differences in Animal Models of Traumatic Brain Injury. J Exp Neurosci. 2019 May 13.
  • publications Hanoun M, Arnal-Estapé A, Maryanovich M, Zahalka AH, Bergren SK, Chua CW, Leftin A, Brodin PN, Shen MM, Guha C, Frenette PS. Nestin(+)NG2(+) Cells Form a Reserve Stem Cell Population in the Mouse Prostate. Stem Cell Reports. 2019 May 10.
  • publications Nakahara F, Borger DK, Wei Q, Pinho S, Maryanovich M, Zahalka AH, Suzuki M, Cruz CD, Wang Z, Xu C, Boulais PE, Ma'ayan A, Greally JM, Frenette PS. Engineering a haematopoietic stem cell niche by revitalizing mesenchymal stromal cells. Nat Cell Biol. 2019 Apr 15.
  • publications Hawk CS, Coelho C, Oliveira DSL, Paredes V, Albuquerque P, Bocca AL, Correa Dos Santos A, Rusakova V, Holemon H, Silva-Pereira I, Felipe MSS, Yagita H, Nicola AM, Casadevall A. Integrin β1 Promotes the Interaction of Murine IgG3 with Effector Cells. J Immunol. 2019 Mar 20.

more publications 

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Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP)