Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP)

Medical Scientist Training Program

Featured Student

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Reid Thompson

Our MSTP - specific anatomy course was one of the most detailed and interesting classes I have ever taken. MSTP students were treated to a personal guided tour of the best features of eight different prossected cadavers.

 

The Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein) is one of the nation’s oldest. From the start, our goal has been to train a diverse group of outstanding students to become future leaders of academic medicine and medical research. Continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health since 1964, the Einstein MSTP has 428 illustrious Alumni with careers spanning the spectrum from basic science research to clinical medicine and many variations in between.

Today, the Einstein MSTP is still unique. Larger than most other MSTPs, it fosters a strong academic and social community within the college. While large enough to be an independent academic unit, the program is still small enough to provide students with the individual attention their unique careers require.

The current training program recognizes that the successful physician-scientist training is not simply medical school plus graduate training. The program integrates MSTP-specific courses with medical and graduate courses, during the first two years of preclinical course work. Integration continues in the PhD thesis years through weekly involvement in the MSTP Continuity Clinic and monthly Clinical Pathological Conferences and MSTP Career Paths seminars.

Students have outstanding publications and residency placements.

Awards & Accomplishments

  • Justin Wheat NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Uncovering Transcriptional Regulation of a Master Hematopoietic Transcription Factor at Single Molecule Resolution" (Sponsor,  Ulrich Steidl & Robert Singer, Cell Biology and Anatomy & Structural Biology)
  • Jeet Biswas NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "The sequence recognition, structure and function of the IMP family of mRNA binding proteins" (Sponsor,  Robert Singer, Anatomy & Structural Biology)
  • Ross Firestone NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Designing Novel Anti-Cancer Therapeutics: Targeting Methionine Metabolism" (Sponsor,  Vern Schramm, Biochemistry)
  • Ali Zahalka NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Contributions of sympathetic signals to prostate cancer progression" (Sponsor,  Paul Frenette, Cell Biology)
  • Sean Healton NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Epigenetic activity of normal and cancer-associated mutant H1 linker histones" (Sponsor,  Arthur Skolutchi, Cell Biology)
  • Cary Weiss NIH NRSA F30 Individual for a project entitled "MicroRNA-22 and the microRNA-22/tet2 network as regulators of the cell fate decision in hematopoietic stem cells and in the development of myelodysplastic syndrome" (Sponsor,  Keisuke Ito, Cell Biology)
  • Ruth Howe, NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Characterizing the Novel Protein C15ORF65" (Sponsor,  Ulrich Steidl, Cell Biology)
  • Marika Osterbur, NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Extra-coding features of mRNA are essential for hERG channel function" (Sponsor, Thomas McDonald, Molecular Pharmacology)
  • Karin Skalina, NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Optimization of non-ablative focused ultrasound therapy for tumor immunity" (Sponsor, Chandan Guha, Pathology)
  • Michael Willcockson, NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Regulators of the erythroid terminal differentiation decision and their connection to the cell cycle" (Sponsor, Art Skoultchi, Cell Biology)
  • Nelson Gil, NIH NRSA F31 Fellowship for a project entitled "The molecular basis of receptor-ligand recognition on the immunological synapse" (Sponsor, Andras Fiser, Systems & Computational Biology)
  • Odelya Kaufman, NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "The role of RBPMS2 in establishing oocyte polarity" (Sponsor, Florence Marlow, Developmental & Molecular Biology)
  • Kim Ohaegbulam, NIH NRSA F31 Fellowship for a project entitled "Tumor expressed B7x accelerates disease and is a novel target for immunotherapy" (Sponsor, Xingxing Zang, Microbiology & Immunology)
  • Jennifer Schloss, NIH NRSA F30 Fellowship for a project entitled "Use of beta cell epitopes in preventing type 1 diabetes in humanized mice" (Sponsor, Teresa DiLorenzo, Microbiology & Immunology)
  • Onyi Uchime, NIH NRSA F31 Fellowship for a project entitled "Novel investigation of the mechanism of BAX modulation" (Sponsor, Evripidis Gavathiotis, Biochemistry)

 more awards 

Publications

  • publicationsFremont R, Tewari A, Angueyra C, Khodakhah K. A role for cerebellum in the hereditary dystonia DYT1. Elife. 2017 Feb 15.
  • publicationsKarp JM, Sparks S, Cowburn D. Effects of FGFR2 kinase activation loop dynamics on catalytic activity. PLoS Comput Biol. 2017 Feb 2
  • publicationsYakubu RR, Silmon de Monerri NC, Nieves E, Kim K, Weiss LM. Comparative Monomethylarginine Proteomics Suggests that PRMT1 is a Significant Contributor to Arginine Monomethylation in Toxoplasma gondii. Mol Cell Proteomics. 2017 Jan.
  • publicationsFirestone RS, Cameron SA, Karp JM, Arcus VL, Schramm VL. Heat Capacity Changes for Transition-State Analogue Binding and Catalysis with Human 5'-Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase. ACS Chem Biol. 2016 Dec.
  • publicationsBowen A, Wear MP, Cordero R, Oscarson S, Casadevall A. A monoclonal antibody to Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan manifests hydrolytic activity for both peptides and polysaccharides. J Biol Chem. 2016 Nov.
  • publicationsCao LL, Riascos-Bernal DF, Chinnasamy P, Dunaway CM, Hou R, Pujato MA, O'Rourke BP, Miskolci V, Guo L, Hodgson L, Fiser A, Sibinga NE. Control of mitochondrial function and cell growth by the atypical cadherin Fat1. Nature. 2016 Nov.

more publications 

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Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP)