Einstein/Montefiore Department of Medicine

In The Media

USA Today interviews Belinda Ostrowsky, M.D., about rapid detection tests for Ebola that are in development. The fastest reliable tests for Ebola currently take about three days, which can delay treatment. Dr. Ostrowsky notes that any rapid detection method would benefit patients and healthcare providers. Dr. Ostrowsky is associate professor of clinical medicine at Einstein and director of the Einstein-Montefiore Antibiotic Stewardship Program.

(Friday, August 15, 2014)

Dr. Ostrowsky's Profile
 
 

NPR’s Morning Edition interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., on the controversy surrounding research on dangerous lab-made pathogens. Following the mishandling of smallpox by the CDC, the potential exposure of CDC scientists to live anthrax and even the recent the spread of Ebola, biologists and others are calling on the National Academy of Sciences to provide guidance on when and under what conditions research using lab-manipulated pathogens should be allowed to move forward. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein. (Dr. Casadevall’s interview begins at 4:38 in the audio version)

(Wednesday, August 13, 2014)

Dr. Casadevall's Profile
 
 

NBC News interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about the history of using serums and antibodies to combat disease in light of an experimental Ebola treatment. Dr. Casadevall notes that antibody treatments, which are most known for fighting infectious diseases, have also had an enormous impact on treating certain cancers, such as breast and colon cancer. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein.

(Wednesday, August 06, 2014)

Dr. Casadevall's Profile
 
 

The Washington Post reports on research by Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., that predicts pre-dementia by measuring walking speed and cognitive abilities. The quick, low-tech test determined that 1 in 10 older adults have pre-dementia. The study involved 27,000 people in 7 countries. It found that those who had unusually slow walking speed and cognitive complaints are twice as likely to develop dementia within 12 years. Dr. Verghese is professor of neurology at Einstein and chief of the division of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center.

(Tuesday, August 05, 2014)

Dr. Verghese's Profile
 
 

The Washington Post reports on research by Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., that predicts pre-dementia by measuring walking speed and cognitive abilities. The quick, low-tech test determined that 1 in 10 older adults have pre-dementia. The study involved 27,000 people in 7 countries. It found that those who had unusually slow walking speed and cognitive complaints are twice as likely to develop dementia within 12 years. Dr. Verghese is professor of neurology at Einstein and chief of the division of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center.

(Tuesday, August 05, 2014)

Dr. Verghese's Profile
 
 

The New York Times Magazine quotes Paul Frenette, M.D., in an article on research linking the nervous system to inflammation. Dr. Frenette has discovered that nerves play a key role in triggering prostate cancer, which is also associated with inflammation. Dr. Frenette is professor of medicine and of cell biology and director of the Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research.

(Tuesday, May 27, 2014)

Dr. Frenette's Profile
 
 

The New York Times Magazine quotes Paul Frenette, M.D., in an article on research linking the nervous system to inflammation. Dr. Frenette has discovered that nerves play a key role in triggering prostate cancer, which is also associated with inflammation. Dr. Frenette is professor of medicine and of cell biology and director of the Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research.

(Tuesday, May 27, 2014)

Dr. Frenette's Profile
 
 

NPR interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about balancing scientific openness with potential security risks in light of research that omitted key details about the deadly Botulism toxin. Dr. Casadevall noted there needs to be a standard for handling such difficult situations and is calling for the creation of a national board to recommend what information should be kept secret. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein.

(Thursday, April 24, 2014)

Dr. Casadevall's Profile
 
 

The Washington Post interviews Brian Currie, M.D., M.P.H., about a new medical research data-sharing network to house the records of nearly 30 million Americans. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s network will make it easier to identify patients who could be invited to join clinical trials and conduct comparative effectiveness and clinical outcomes research. Dr. Currie is professor of clinical medicine and of clinical epidemiology & population health at Einstein and assistant dean for clinical research at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Friday, April 18, 2014)

Dr. Currie's Profile
 
 

The Washington Post interviews Brian Currie, M.D., M.P.H., about a new medical research data-sharing network to house the records of nearly 30 million Americans. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s network will make it easier to identify patients who could be invited to join clinical trials and conduct comparative effectiveness and clinical outcomes research. Dr. Currie is professor of clinical medicine and of clinical epidemiology & population health at Einstein and assistant dean for clinical research at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Friday, April 18, 2014)

Dr. Currie's Profile
 
 

Wall Street Journal ran an op-ed co-written by Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., that supports turning the National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant process into a lottery. Dr. Casadevall and co-author Ferric Fang, M.D., of the University of Washington, cite research that highlights problems with the current peer review grant process, including bias influencing funding decisions. They suggest that a lottery would make the process more transparent and alleviate stress on scarce resources. Views expressed in the op-ed, available only via subscription, represent those of Drs. Casadevall and Fang and not Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein.

(Thursday, April 17, 2014)

Dr. Casadevall's Profile
 
 

How much dietary salt is necessary? NBC’s “The Today Show” features research by Michael Alderman, M.D., that found current salt guidelines may be too low for most Americans. The collaborative study by Dr. Alderman and researchers at the Copenhagen University Hospital found that the average daily sodium intake of most Americans (between around 2,600 milligrams to 5,000 milligrams daily) is actually associated with better health outcomes than many current recommended guidelines (below 2,300 mg/day). Dr. Alderman is distinguished university professor emeritus of epidemiology & population health and of medicine, and holds the Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine.

(Wednesday, April 02, 2014)

Dr. Alderman's Profile
 
 

The BBC Radio 4 program More or Less, interviews Paul Marantz, M.D., M.P.H., about a widely reported study in the British Medical Journal that found “an apple a day” was as effective as statins in preventing death. Dr. Marantz asserts that the journal’s publicity for the paper, published as part of the BMJ’s traditionally lighthearted Christmas issue, oversimplifies the issue and misleadingly compares the results of rigorous clinical trials for statins with much weaker observational data about food intake. Dr. Marantz came to the attention of the BBC as a result of a post he authored for Einstein’s blog, The Doctor’s Tablet. Dr. Marantz is associate dean for clinical research education and professor of clinical epidemiology & population health and of clinical medicine. (Segment begins at 21:00 of “Obesity Crisis?” episode, January 17, 2014)

(Tuesday, January 21, 2014)

Dr. Marantz's Profile
 
 

The Atlantic features research by Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., that suggests an easy way to help increase the number of female speakers at conferences. Dr. Casadevall’s study found having at least one woman on the organizing committee of a meeting increased the proportion of female speakers by 72 percent compared with those convened by men alone. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology and director of the Center for Immunological Sciences at Einstein.

(Tuesday, January 07, 2014)

Dr. Casadevall's Profile
 
 

The Atlantic features research by Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., that suggests an easy way to help increase the number of female speakers at conferences. Dr. Casadevall’s study found having at least one woman on the organizing committee of a meeting increased the proportion of female speakers by 72 percent compared with those convened by men alone. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology and director of the Center for Immunological Sciences at Einstein.

(Tuesday, January 07, 2014)

Dr. Casadevall's Profile
 
 
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