Einstein/Montefiore Department of Medicine

In The Media

The New York Times Magazine quotes Paul Frenette, M.D., in an article on research linking the nervous system to inflammation. Dr. Frenette has discovered that nerves play a key role in triggering prostate cancer, which is also associated with inflammation. Dr. Frenette is professor of medicine and of cell biology and director of the Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research.

(Tuesday, May 27, 2014)

Dr. Frenette's Profile
 
 

NPR interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about balancing scientific openness with potential security risks in light of research that omitted key details about the deadly Botulism toxin. Dr. Casadevall noted there needs to be a standard for handling such difficult situations and is calling for the creation of a national board to recommend what information should be kept secret. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein.

(Thursday, April 24, 2014)

Dr. Casadevall's Profile
 
 

The Washington Post interviews Brian Currie, M.D., M.P.H., about a new medical research data-sharing network to house the records of nearly 30 million Americans. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s network will make it easier to identify patients who could be invited to join clinical trials and conduct comparative effectiveness and clinical outcomes research. Dr. Currie is professor of clinical medicine and of clinical epidemiology & population health at Einstein and assistant dean for clinical research at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Friday, April 18, 2014)

Dr. Currie's Profile
 
 

The Washington Post interviews Brian Currie, M.D., M.P.H., about a new medical research data-sharing network to house the records of nearly 30 million Americans. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s network will make it easier to identify patients who could be invited to join clinical trials and conduct comparative effectiveness and clinical outcomes research. Dr. Currie is professor of clinical medicine and of clinical epidemiology & population health at Einstein and assistant dean for clinical research at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Friday, April 18, 2014)

Dr. Currie's Profile
 
 

Wall Street Journal ran an op-ed co-written by Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., that supports turning the National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant process into a lottery. Dr. Casadevall and co-author Ferric Fang, M.D., of the University of Washington, cite research that highlights problems with the current peer review grant process, including bias influencing funding decisions. They suggest that a lottery would make the process more transparent and alleviate stress on scarce resources. Views expressed in the op-ed, available only via subscription, represent those of Drs. Casadevall and Fang and not Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein.

(Thursday, April 17, 2014)

Dr. Casadevall's Profile
 
 

How much dietary salt is necessary? NBC’s “The Today Show” features research by Michael Alderman, M.D., that found current salt guidelines may be too low for most Americans. The collaborative study by Dr. Alderman and researchers at the Copenhagen University Hospital found that the average daily sodium intake of most Americans (between around 2,600 milligrams to 5,000 milligrams daily) is actually associated with better health outcomes than many current recommended guidelines (below 2,300 mg/day). Dr. Alderman is distinguished university professor emeritus of epidemiology & population health and of medicine, and holds the Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine.

(Wednesday, April 02, 2014)

Dr. Alderman's Profile
 
 

The BBC Radio 4 program More or Less, interviews Paul Marantz, M.D., M.P.H., about a widely reported study in the British Medical Journal that found “an apple a day” was as effective as statins in preventing death. Dr. Marantz asserts that the journal’s publicity for the paper, published as part of the BMJ’s traditionally lighthearted Christmas issue, oversimplifies the issue and misleadingly compares the results of rigorous clinical trials for statins with much weaker observational data about food intake. Dr. Marantz came to the attention of the BBC as a result of a post he authored for Einstein’s blog, The Doctor’s Tablet. Dr. Marantz is associate dean for clinical research education and professor of clinical epidemiology & population health and of clinical medicine. (Segment begins at 21:00 of “Obesity Crisis?” episode, January 17, 2014)

(Tuesday, January 21, 2014)

Dr. Marantz's Profile
 
 

The Atlantic features research by Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., that suggests an easy way to help increase the number of female speakers at conferences. Dr. Casadevall’s study found having at least one woman on the organizing committee of a meeting increased the proportion of female speakers by 72 percent compared with those convened by men alone. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology and director of the Center for Immunological Sciences at Einstein.

(Tuesday, January 07, 2014)

Dr. Casadevall's Profile
 
 

The Atlantic features research by Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., that suggests an easy way to help increase the number of female speakers at conferences. Dr. Casadevall’s study found having at least one woman on the organizing committee of a meeting increased the proportion of female speakers by 72 percent compared with those convened by men alone. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology and director of the Center for Immunological Sciences at Einstein.

(Tuesday, January 07, 2014)

Dr. Casadevall's Profile
 
 

WNYC Radio interviews Edward Burns, M.D., about the planned budget deal could restore some funding to the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Burns notes that the sequester – which cut budgets between five to ten percent – was deadly for research and might even stop young scientists from pursuing a research career. Dr. Burns is executive dean and professor of pathology and of medicine. (Audio begins at 1:32)

(Thursday, December 19, 2013)

Dr. Burns' Profile
 
 

WNYC Radio interviews Edward Burns, M.D., about the planned budget deal could restore some funding to the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Burns notes that the sequester – which cut budgets between five to ten percent – was deadly for research and might even stop young scientists from pursuing a research career. Dr. Burns is executive dean and professor of pathology and of medicine. (Audio begins at 1:32)

(Thursday, December 19, 2013)

Dr. Burns' Profile
 
 

The Scientist profiles Ana Maria Cuervo, M.D., Ph.D., detailing her career path and research in autophagy. The career retrospective follows Dr. Cuervo’s career from her first medical student project in Spain to her arrival at Einstein. Dr. Cuervo is professor of developmental and molecular biology, of anatomy and structural biology, and of medicine and holds the Robert and Renée Belfer Chair for the Study of Neurodegenerative Diseases at Einstein.

(Friday, November 01, 2013)

Dr. Cuervo's Profile
 
 

BBC News interviews Harry Ostrer, M.D., and The New York Times cites research by Gil Atzmon, Ph.D., in two articles about a new study on Jewish genetic history. The new study analyzed mitochondrial DNA, genetic information inherited through women, and found that at least 80 percent of Ashkenazi maternal ancestry hailed from Europe, not the Middle East, suggesting that many European Jewish communities were founded by men who married and converted local women. Dr. Ostrer is professor of pathology, of genetics and of pediatrics at Einstein and director of genetic and genomic testing at Montefiore Medical Center. Dr. Atzmon is associate professor of medicine and of genetics.

(Wednesday, October 09, 2013)

Dr. Ostrer's Profile | Dr. Atzmon's Profile
 
 

NPR interviews Johanna Daily, M.D., about the new, modestly effective RTS,S malaria vaccine that reduced disease in children by 27-46 percent. Dr. Daily notes that while higher efficacy rates are desirable, malaria is a particularly challenging disease that researchers have struggled to prevent. She explains that each country that battles with malaria will have to choose how to spend their limited resources – on this vaccine, protective nets, community health workers or other options. Dr. Daily is associate professor of medicine and of microbiology & immunology.

(Tuesday, October 08, 2013)

Dr. Daily's Profile
 
 

CBSNews.com interviews Lou Weiss, M.D., M.P.H., about a new blood test that determines whether a person's respiratory illness is caused by virus or bacteria. Dr. Weiss explains that the test, which provides results in only 12 hours, has the potential to be extremely beneficial because it can help with diagnosis and prevent doctors from giving unnecessary antibiotics, which drives the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. Dr. Weiss is professor of pathology and of medicine at Einstein.

(Tuesday, September 24, 2013)

Dr. Weiss' Profile
 
 
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