Einstein/Montefiore Department of Medicine

In The Media

The New York Times references Einstein’s centenarian studies and Nir Barzilai, M.D., in an obituary on 109-year old Irving Kahn. Kahn, considered the oldest active Wall Street investor before his death, was a participant in Dr. Barzilai’s studies at Einstein’s Institute of Aging Research. He was also profiled as part of Einstein’s Longevity Genes Project video series. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein and attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Friday, February 27, 2015)

Dr. Barzilai's Profile
 
 

Bloomberg News interviews Nir Barzilai, M.D., about Novartis’ efforts to develop FDA-approved drug rapamycin as an anti-aging, preventative therapy. It was long believed that rapamycin suppressed the immune response, rendering it unsuitable for long-term use in older adults. However, Dr. Barzilai notes that a recent “watershed” moment occurred when new research found it merely modulated the immune response in humans, clearing the way for more research. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein and attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Thursday, February 12, 2015)

Dr. Barzilai's Profile
 
 

USA Today interviews Dr. David Rosenstreich about research that finds poverty and poor living conditions are the causes of high rates of asthma – whether in cities or suburbs. As the concentration of poverty has increased in suburbs and rural areas, so have the rates of asthma in those areas. Dr. Rosenstreich points out that the asthma rates are vastly different in Harlem compared to the Upper West Side of Manhattan, although the two neighborhoods are next to each other. This reinforces that it is low socioeconomic status and associated poor living conditions that leads to asthma. Dr. Rosenstreich is professor and director of the division of allergy and immunology in the department of medicine at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center and the Joseph and Sadie Danciger Distinguished Scholar in Microbiology/Immunology at Einstein.

(Tuesday, January 20, 2015)

Dr. Rosenstreich's Profile
 
 

What’s a question your doctor should be asking you according to a Time interview with Peter Selwyn, M.D., M.P.H., and Einstein medical student Ross Kristal? Their study, which found a correlation between soda consumption and health problems, suggests that asking how much soda a patient drinks should be included when taking a patient’s history. Kristal, a fourth year medical student, notes that information about overall diet and physical activity are vital in preventing and managing certain diseases but is rarely captured, which is why the question is standard at Montefiore Medical Center, the University Hospital for Einstein. Dr. Selwyn is chair of family and social medicine at Einstein and Montefiore.

(Tuesday, December 30, 2014)

Dr. Selwyn's Profile
 
 

The New York Times and NPR feature Nir Barzilai, M.D., and one of his centenarian study participants in a joint article on aging. Dr. Barzilai notes that as a scientist, his goal isn’t to help people live longer, but to live healthier. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research and director the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein and attending physician at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Wednesday, November 19, 2014)

Dr. Barzilai's Profile
 
 

Nature interviews Ana Maria Cuervo, M.D., Ph.D., about her research on autophagy, a critical cellular recycling process linked to numerous diseases. Dr. Cuervo’s numerous contributions in the field are detailed, including implicating faulty autophagy in Parkinson’s disease and discovering its role in regulating hunger in the brain and metabolism in the liver. Dr. Cuervo is professor of developmental and molecular biology, of anatomy and structural biology, and of medicine, co-director of the Institute for Aging Research, and holds the Robert and Renée Belfer Chair for the Study of Neurodegenerative Diseases at Einstein.

(Thursday, October 16, 2014)

Dr. Cuervo's Profile
 
 

Nature interviews Ana Maria Cuervo, M.D., Ph.D., about her research on autophagy, a critical cellular recycling process linked to numerous diseases. Dr. Cuervo’s numerous contributions in the field are detailed, including implicating faulty autophagy in Parkinson’s disease and discovering its role in regulating hunger in the brain and metabolism in the liver. Dr. Cuervo is professor of developmental and molecular biology, of anatomy and structural biology, and of medicine, co-director of the Institute for Aging Research, and holds the Robert and Renée Belfer Chair for the Study of Neurodegenerative Diseases at Einstein.

(Thursday, October 16, 2014)

Dr. Cuervo's Profile
 
 

CBS News interviews Chinazo Cunningham, M.D., M.S., about the growing problem of opioid painkiller abuse and addiction. Dr. Cunningham explains why opioid abuse has increased significantly in recent years, her research on bias on the part of doctors in prescribing and monitoring opioids, and how Einstein has a structured curriculum to teach future doctors how to treat addition. Dr. Cunningham is professor of medicine and family and social medicine at Einstein and associate chief of the division of general internal medicine at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Monday, October 13, 2014)

Dr. Cunningham's Profile
 
 

The New York Times features new research by Elina Jerschow, M.D., that found medications are the cause of most fatal allergic reactions. Dr. Jerschow notes that antibiotics and radiocontrast agents used in imaging studies are the two top medicines responsible for allergic deaths. Dr. Jerschow is assistant professor of medicine at Einstein and director of the Drug Allergy Center at Montefiore Medical Center.

(Monday, October 06, 2014)

Dr. Jerschow's Profile
 
 

Wall Street Journal interviews Judy Wylie-Rosett, Ph.D., about research that suggests artificial sweeteners may raise blood sugar levels by altering the body’s gut bacteria. Dr. Wylie-Rosett notes that the study is important since it is the first to examine how gut microbes contribute to processing real and fake sugars. Dr. Wylie-Rosett is head of the division of health promotion and nutrition research, and professor of epidemiology & population health and of medicine at Einstein.

(Thursday, September 18, 2014)

Dr. Rosett's Profile
 
 

New York Times interviews Kami Kim, M.D., about research that finds the parasite Toxoplasma gondii can manipulate the behavior of its host by switching on genes in brain cells. Research by Dr. Kim has found that a number of pathogens, including leprosy, appear to use DNA methylation to turn genes on and off in the animal it infects. Dr. Kim is professor medicine, of microbiology & immunology and of pathology.

(Friday, August 29, 2014)

Dr. Kim's Profile
 
 

USA Today interviews Belinda Ostrowsky, M.D., about rapid detection tests for Ebola that are in development. The fastest reliable tests for Ebola currently take about three days, which can delay treatment. Dr. Ostrowsky notes that any rapid detection method would benefit patients and healthcare providers. Dr. Ostrowsky is associate professor of clinical medicine at Einstein and director of the Einstein-Montefiore Antibiotic Stewardship Program.

(Friday, August 15, 2014)

Dr. Ostrowsky's Profile
 
 

NPR’s Morning Edition interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., on the controversy surrounding research on dangerous lab-made pathogens. Following the mishandling of smallpox by the CDC, the potential exposure of CDC scientists to live anthrax and even the recent the spread of Ebola, biologists and others are calling on the National Academy of Sciences to provide guidance on when and under what conditions research using lab-manipulated pathogens should be allowed to move forward. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein. (Dr. Casadevall’s interview begins at 4:38 in the audio version)

(Wednesday, August 13, 2014)

Dr. Casadevall's Profile
 
 

NBC News interviews Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., about the history of using serums and antibodies to combat disease in light of an experimental Ebola treatment. Dr. Casadevall notes that antibody treatments, which are most known for fighting infectious diseases, have also had an enormous impact on treating certain cancers, such as breast and colon cancer. Dr. Casadevall is professor and chair of microbiology & immunology and the Leo and Julia Forchheimer Chair in Microbiology & Immunology at Einstein.

(Wednesday, August 06, 2014)

Dr. Casadevall's Profile
 
 

The Washington Post reports on research by Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., that predicts pre-dementia by measuring walking speed and cognitive abilities. The quick, low-tech test determined that 1 in 10 older adults have pre-dementia. The study involved 27,000 people in 7 countries. It found that those who had unusually slow walking speed and cognitive complaints are twice as likely to develop dementia within 12 years. Dr. Verghese is professor of neurology at Einstein and chief of the division of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center.

(Tuesday, August 05, 2014)

Dr. Verghese's Profile
 
 
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