Einstein/Montefiore Department of Medicine

Department Faculty

Michael H. Alderman, M.D.

Dr. Michael H. Alderman

Distinguished University Professor Emeritus, Department of Epidemiology & Population Health

Distinguished University Professor Emeritus, Department of Medicine (General Internal Medicine)

Atran Foundation Chair in Social Medicine


Professional Interests

A specialist in hypertension, Dr. Michael Alderman is widely recognized for having questioned public health initiatives to lower the recommended level of dietary salt. His research has focused on understanding the wide variety of cardiovascular outcomes among patients with high blood pressure. He has been featured by The New York Times, the Associated Press and The Wall Street Journal.

Dr. Alderman has led pioneering studies on the roles of renin-angiotensin and salt system (a hormonal system that regulates blood pressure and fluid balance) in cardiovascular disease. In 1973, he established the Worksite program for hypertensive care, a model for effective care and the largest ongoing treatment program of its kind.

Dr. Alderman has authored more than 270 scientific papers, book chapters and textbooks. He is editor of the American Journal of Hypertension, a fellow of the American College of Physicians, a member of the Association of American Physicians, and a past president of both the American Society of Hypertension and the International Society of Hypertension.


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Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus
1300 Morris Park Avenue
Belfer Building, Room 1315A
Bronx, NY 10461

Tel: 718.430.2281

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Media Coverage

New York Times interviews Dr. Michael Alderman about a new study that will likely change clinical guidelines and goals for blood pressure.

How much dietary salt is necessary? NBC’s “The Today Show” features research by Dr. Michael Alderman that found current salt guidelines may be too low for most Americans.

More media coverage