Biostatistics

Biostatistics

Overview

The mission of the Division of Biostatistics in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health is to (1) develop and apply innovative statistical and computational approaches to advance biomedical research; (2) collaborate with investigators in a broad range of fields including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurology, and infectious diseases, and (3) provide educational and training opportunities in quantitative methods to the next generation of physicians and scientists.

The Division of Biostatistics was established in 2003 and currently includes over 20 doctoral and masters level statisticians. Biostatistics faculty receive grants from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Centers for Disease Controls, and other federal funding agencies to conduct methodological research in clinical trials, epidemiology, experimental design, survival analysis, diagnostic test evaluation, imaging studies, and statistical genetics and genomics. Other areas of interest include missing data methods, casual inference, and comparative effectiveness research.

 
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Biostatistics Resources

The Division of Biostatistics offers biostatistics consulting and collaboration to enhance the quality and rigor of scientific research conducted by investigators at Einstein and Montefiore. Statistical support is available from the NIH funded Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Resource (BERD) of the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, the NCI funded Biostatistics Shared Resource (BSR) of the Albert Einstein Cancer Center, and the Walk-in Statistical Consulting Centers that are available on both the East and West campuses.

 

Institute for Clinical and Translational Research
Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Resource (BERD)Albert Einstein Cancer Center Biostatistics Shared Resource

The objective of the BERD Core in the Institute for Clinical Translational Research is to provide statistical and epidemiologic expertise on the design, conduct, analysis, and reporting of clinical and translational studies; provide support for new research initiatives and the development of protocols and applications for peer-reviewed funding; and identify new problems requiring the development of novel clinical and translational statistical methods. To arrange a consultation with a BERD statistician, submit the online consultation request form at the following link: click here 

 
 
 

Albert Einstein Cancer Center Biostatistics Shared ResourceAlbert Einstein Cancer Center Biostatistics Shared Resource

The Biostatistics Shared Resource (BSR) of the Albert Einstein Cancer Center includes faculty and staff who collaborate with Einstein cancer investigators on basic science, clinical, translational, observational and clinical research. More information about obtaining statistical support on a cancer project is available at: click here 

 
 
 

Walk-in Statistical Consulting CenterWalk-in Statistical Consulting Center

Investigators can visit the weekly walk-in statistical consulting centers to meet with a statistician without appointment and obtain quick advice on their projects. The walk-in center hours are Einstein campus: Tuesday afternoons from 3 – 5 pm in Belfer 1303 (see Dr. Mimi Kim);  Montefiore campus: First and third Thursday of every month from 2- 4 pm, 3411 Wayne Avenue Room 824 (see Dr. Jaeun Choi).  


 

 
 

News

Dr. Jaeun Choi's paper, Estimating the causal effect of treatment in observational studies with survival time end points and unmeasured confounding, published in the Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series C (Applied Statistics), was one of the journal’s top 20 most downloaded recent papers.  

 
Dr. Melissa Fazzari joined the Division of Biostatistics as Associate Professor in November. She was previously Director of Biostatistics at NYU Winthrop Hospital.  

 

Dr. Cuiling Wang received a R21 grant from the National Institute on Aging to develop statistical approaches to correct bias in estimating risk of Alzheimer's disease and cognitive and mobility decline using auxiliary information. 

 

Dr. Tao Wang received a R21 grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to develop and apply genome-wide mendelian randomization methods to examine the relationship between obesity and lung cancer.

 

 

Events

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