Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center

Archived Funding Announcements

  

FUNDS ARE AVAILABLE 2017 FOR INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES-RELATED RESEARCH PROJECTS 

The Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (RFK IDDRC) is pleased to once again announce the availability of Pilot and Feasibility awards (up to $20,000 annually per award) for both basic science and translational projects that involve intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs). The awarded funds are intended to enable new and established investigators to generate preliminary data in order to successfully apply for extramural funding for their projects; they are not intended to support or supplement ongoing, funded IDD research programs. This year we are particularly interested in receiving pilot grants focused on priority research areas that are part of our Children’s Brain Initiative (see here for more details).

Eligible applicants must hold the rank of instructor or higher at the time of the award. It is not necessary to be an RFK IDDRC investigator or clinical partner at the time the application is submitted.

This program is designed to support:

1) New investigators with interests in IDD research. Meritorious applications from new investigators will receive priority for funding.

2) Established faculty who wish to explore a new area of research involving IDDs that constitutes a substantive departure from their on-going work.

3) Established faculty currently focused on IDD-related research who are attempting to build preliminary data for additional NIH grant support.

APPLICATION 

A one-page letter of intent (LOI), using the RFK-IDDRC LOI template, is required by midnight October 16, 2016. Those selected will be informed shortly thereafter, and asked to submit an R03-style grant applications due on or before November 30th, 2016. Additional details of how to assemble the grant will be provided with the notice of acceptance of the LOI. It is anticipated that the one-year funding for successful applicants will be initiated on January 1, 2017.  

In your one-page LOI please include (1) a brief overview of your specific aims and hypothesis to be tested, (2) the project relevance to IDDs, (3) a list of the IDDRC cores you expect to access and (4) a proposed budget. In terms of the budget, the total amount requested can be up to $20,000, although smaller requests are strongly recommended. Salary support for the PI is not allowed. Please note: It is required that 25% of the grant budget be used to cover costs of RFK IDDRC scientific core use. A description of the 4 newly configured scientific cores of the IDDRC can be found at http://www.einstein.yu.edu/centers/iddrc.

 

Submit your one-page LOI electronically as an e-mail attachment to rfk.iddrc@einstein.yu.edu on or before October 16, 2016. Questions concerning this program should be directed to Lisa Guillory (lisa.guillory@einstein.yu.edu).

 

 

The Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (RFK IDDRC) announces the availability of 2016 IDDRC Pilot and Feasibility awards (up to $20,000 annually per award) for both basic science and translational projects that involve intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs). The awarded funds are intended to enable new and established investigators to generate preliminary data in order to successfully apply for extramural funding for their project. Pilot and feasibility funds are not intended to support or supplement ongoing IDD research programs. Eligible applicants must hold the rank of instructor or higher at the time of the award.

ELIGIBILITY. This program is designed to support:

  1. New investigators with interests in IDD research. Meritorious applications from new investigators will receive priority for funding.
  2. Established faculty who wish to explore a new area of research involving IDDs that constitutes a substantive departure from their on-going work.
  3. Established faculty currently focused on IDD-related research who are attempting to build preliminary data for additional NIH grant support.

Please note: It is not necessary to be an RFK IDDRC investigator or clinical partner at the time the application is submitted.

APPLICATION

A one-page letter of intent (LOI), using the attached template, is required by October 15, 2015. Those selected will be informed shortly thereafter, with R03-style grant applications due on or before December 1, 2015. Additional details of how to assemble the grant will be provided with the notice of acceptance of the LOI. It is anticipated that the one-year funding for successful applicants will be initiated on January 1, 2016.

In your one-page LOI please include (1) an overview of your specific aims and (2) hypothesis to be tested, (3) its relevance to IDDs, (4) a list of the IDDRC cores you expect to access and (5) a proposed budget. In terms of the budget, the total amount requested can be up to $20,000, although smaller requests are strongly recommended. Salary support for the investigator is not allowed. Please note: It is required that 25% of the grant budget be used to cover costs of RFK IDDRC scientific core use. A description of the 6 scientific cores of the IDDRC can be found at http://www.einstein.yu.edu/centers/iddrc, under "Research Cores."

Submit your one-page LOI electronically as an e-mail attachment to rfk.iddrc@einstein.yu.edu on or before October 15, 2015. Please use the RFK-IDDRC LOI Pilot Project template. Questions concerning this program should be directed to Lisa Guillory.  

FUNDS ARE AVAILABLE FOR INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES-RELATED RESEARCH PROJECTS 

The Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (IDDRC) is accepting applications for inclusion of an investigator-initiated 6-module R01-style grant (up to $150,000/year direct cost x 5 years) for its 2016 competing renewal application. NICHD-supported IDDRC grants have changed from a P30 to a U54 mechanism and as part of this change all newly submitted competing renewals must contain one R01-style research project. A major advantage of having your project selected to be included within the Rose F. Kennedy Center renewal application is that if the application is funded, the research grant will also be funded for the full 5 years (2016-21) of the center grant. Since scoring of the overall center renewal application depends in part on the quality of its selected research component, as well as how it utilizes IDDRC resources and represents the institutional strengths at Einstein/Montefiore, we are seeking the most compelling ideas for this IDD-focused research project from Einstein/Montefiore faculty.

Selection of the final proposal for inclusion in our competing renewal will be by a competitive process. Research project concepts submitted for consideration in this competition should be provided in a 1-page (max) document containing the proposal’s title and specific aims describing the overall project and its goals, the principal investigator(s) and co-investigators, as well as what IDDRC cores would be used. If necessary and fully justified, we are also prepared to provide up to $5000 in immediate pilot funding as well as high priority access to IDDRC core services in order to generate pilot data for a full application. Requests for this pilot funding need full justification along with a list of the IDDRC cores to be utilized, with all of this described in an additional 300 word (max) statement appended to the specific aims page. The deadline for submitting a concept proposal for consideration in this competition is  April 15, 2015. Such applications should be sent to Lisa.Guillory@einstein.yu.edu by 6 pm on this day.

 

Following review of the concept proposals by a committee created by the IDDRC leadership, up to 4 of the most compelling ideas will be selected and the respective investigators invited to develop a 6-module ($150K) R01-style proposal (with the assistance of the RFK IDDRC leadership as needed). The expectation is that a complete R01 application will be prepared and submitted to us by July 15, 2015. From these applications, a finalist will be selected for integration and inclusion into the 2016 IDDRC renewal application. It is anticipated that each of the invited R01-style applications, if not selected for final inclusion in the IDDRC renewal application, would be eligible for separate submission to the NIH as stand-alone grants, with timing of submission at the discretion of the investigators.

Specific NICHD stipulations of the proposed R01-style grant are as follows:

A) The proposal must be a NEW study (i.e., not currently funded) and must be critically focused on IDD research. (A description of IDD-related interests at NICHD is included at the end of this announcement.) The concept proposal must also include at least one element of translational relevance (relating to risk assessment, outcomes assessment, or intervention).

B) The proposal must substantively utilize the Human Clinical Phenotyping (HCP) core of the IDDRC and at least one additional core facility of the IDDRC (Neurogenomics, Tissue Engineering and Cellular Reprograming, Cell and Molecular Imagining, Animal Behavior, and Translational Neuroimaging). Even better, several, or all, of these cores would be used. For information on services provided by these IDDRC cores see: http://www.einstein.yu.edu/centers/iddrc/research-cores/human-clinical-phenotyping.aspx

C) The proposal budget would total up to $150,000 (i.e., 6-modules) for direct costs acquired through the IDDRC mechanism; however, if additional funds can be obtained by partnering with another funding source this would be a clear advantage (e.g., $150,000 acquired through the IDDRC plus $50-100,000 provided by a private foundation).

D) The proposal must address one or more of the five NICHD focus themes identified as an area of research need in terms of IDD, summarized on the next page. (Note: NICHD allows rather broad interpretation of these criteria.)

    NICHD Criteria for Inclusion for Research Projects within U54 Center Grants:
  1. Comprehensive –omic Approaches
    Comprehensive -omic approaches (e.g., genomic, transcriptomic, epigenomic, metabolomic) that will markedly increase our understanding of IDD conditions with no known etiology or IDD conditions with complex etiologies to improve diagnosis, and potentially, treatment. Examples include, but are not limited to:
    • whole exome or whole genome sequencing of a well-defined cohort of subjects with IDD to identify genetic or genomic variants likely to cause the phenotype;
    • methylation or other studies on individuals with a shared IDD diagnosis but variable manifestations (such as range of cognitive function) to identify potential epigenetic contributors;
    • tandem mass spectrometry on biological samples such as saliva, blood or urine from a group of individuals with metabolic or other disorders associated with intellectual disability that might define distinctive biomarkers or metabolic signatures that would allow monitoring of outcomes or response to treatment.
  2. Outcome Measures for Interventions or Treatments
    Development of preclinical or clinical outcome measures or biomarkers for the cognitive and/or behavioral phenotypes of IDD that have the potential to demonstrate a change in response to intervention or treatment. Examples include, but are not limited to:
    • development of a measure for an animal model (e.g., mouse, rat, nonhuman primate) of an IDD disorder that reliably detects changes in behavior response to a drug treatment;
    • development of a measure of cognitive function in individuals with an IDD that is sensitive to an intervention;
    • demonstration of changes in an existing behavioral measure in individuals with an IDD condition in response to therapy.
  3. Multi-modal Treatment Approaches
    Development of bi- or multi-modal treatment approaches for a single IDD condition or a group of IDD conditions or spectrum disorders to demonstrate combinatorial effects to ameliorate a cognitive or behavioral symptom(s) of the condition(s). The interventions may or may not be disease-specific, and the potential to broaden to multiple IDD disorders is encouraged. Examples include, but are not limited to:
    • use of a drug and a training paradigm in an IDD animal model to demonstrate improvement in a behavioral measure;
    • use of a medication and behavioral treatment in combination for individuals with an IDD condition to demonstrate improved efficacy;
    • use of one well-established intervention plus 1-2 medications to improve general symptoms of a mood disorder in individuals with different IDD conditions who share that mood disorder.
  4. Shared Resources across IDDRCs for Treatment or Assessment
    Development of an assessment battery or clinical intervention for an IDD condition or group of IDD conditions that links more than one funded IDDRC into a network, with sharing of at least one unique core resource from each IDDRC. Examples include, but are not limited to:
    • development of an assessment paradigm for an allelic series of animal models for an IDD condition that uses the genomics core of one IDDRC and the animal behavioral core of another IDDRC;
    • development of a testing paradigm for a specific IDD condition that uses the biostatistics core from one IDDRC and the human behavioral assessment core of another IDDRC;
    • creation of a clinical trial for an IDD condition that utilizes the patient recruitment core from one IDDRC and the trial design core from another IDDRC.
  5. Public Health Approaches Public health approaches to IDD that identify potentially preventable, modifiable, or treatable targets that can yield a rich payoff in ameliorating or improving outcomes for large groups of individuals with IDD or that will reduce risk of developing an IDD. These may include preconceptional, prenatal, postnatal or childhood exposures or risk factors, and may involve the broader family or community. Examples include, but are not limited to:
    • a project that addresses the risk of developing an IDD due to preterm birth;
    • a project that addresses maternal exposures to potential teratogens (alcohol, cocaine, cytomegalovirus, etc.)

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Branch at NICHD: Background information

The IDD branch at NICHD, formerly the Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Branch, sponsors research and research training aimed at preventing and ameliorating intellectual and related developmental disabilities. The IDD Branch has a longstanding history of providing support for a diverse portfolio of research projects, training programs, and research centers dedicated to promoting the well-being of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. When the Institute was created at the NIH in 1962 at the request of then-President John F. Kennedy and with the support of congress, one if its primary charges was to encourage investigations in human development throughout the lifespan, with an emphasis on understanding IDDs.

    The mission of the IDD Branch at NICHD is to:
  • Develop and support research and research training programs in IDDs, including common and rare neuromuscular and neurodevelopmental disorders, such as Down, Fragile X, and Rett syndromes, inborn errors of metabolism, autism spectrum disorders, and others;
  • Promote studies designed to understand the etiology and pathophysiology of abnormal nervous system development and to delineate genetic, genomic, and epigenetic bases of IDD;
  • Support research designed to examine the screening, diagnosis, treatment, and management of IDD and other conditions identified by newborn screening or other screening methods;
  • Promote multidisciplinary and translational research in IDD through programs that integrate basic and applied research, training, and service activities for those with IDD and their families;
  • Collaborate with other federal agencies, organizations, and advocacy groups to advance efforts toward the prevention and diagnosis of IDD as well as early intervention and treatment for these conditions.
    Areas of research for investigators at IDDRCs include (but are not limited to) studies of:
  • Chromosomal conditions that cause IDD, such as Prader-Willi syndrome, Angelman syndrome, Williams syndrome, and Down syndrome;
  • Conditions identified by newborn screening associated with cognitive impairment;
  • Other conditions that are characterized by IDD;
  • X-chromosome disorders, such as Rett syndrome and Fragile X syndrome, that result in IDD;
  • Disorders that involve biochemical processes and metabolic issues related to brain functioning, brain injury, or long-term consequences to the brain, such as hypoxia, very low birth weight, Phenylketonuria, and prenatal malnutrition; and
  • Biological or biochemical mechanisms that cause behavioral problems, such as those found in autism spectrum disorders, self-injurious behavior, and impairments in language development.
 

FUNDS ARE AVAILABLE FOR INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES-RELATED RESEARCH PROJECTS 

The Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (RFK IDDRC) announces the availability of Pilot and Feasibility Awards (up to $25,000 annually-per award) for both basic science and translational projects that involve intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs).  The awarded funds are intended to enable new and established investigators to generate preliminary data in order to successfully apply for extramural funding for their project.  Pilot and feasibility funds are not intended to support or supplement ongoing IDD research programs. Eligible applicants must hold the rank of instructor or higher at the time of the award.  We anticipate making four (4) awards this year.
 

ELIGIBILITY (in order of priority): This program is designed to support:

  1. New investigators with interests in IDD research. Meritorious applications from new investigators will receive priority for funding.
  2. Established faculty who wish to explore a new area of research involving IDDs that constitutes a substantive departure from their on-going work.
  3. Established faculty currently focused on IDD-related research who are attempting to build preliminary data for additional NIH grant support.

    Please note: It is not necessary to be an RFK IDDRC investigator or clinical partner at the time the application is submitted. 

APPLICATION
The deadline for submission of a required, one-page letter of intent (LOI) is Wednesday, October 15, 2014.  Please use the attached LOI Template.  Those selected will be informed shortly thereafter, and will then be required to submit an R03-style grant application on or before December 1, 2014.  Additional details of how to assemble the grant will be provided with the notice of acceptance of the LOI.  It is anticipated that the one-year funding for successful applicants will be initiated on January 1, 2015.   

 In your one-page LOI please include (1) an overview of your specific aims and (2) hypothesis to be tested, (3) its relevance to IDDs, (4) a list of the IDDRC cores you expect to access and (5) a proposed budget.  In terms of the budget, the total amount requested can be up to $25,000, although smaller requests are strongly recommended.  Salary support for the investigator is not allowed.  Please note:  It is reequired that 25% of the grant budget be used to cover costs of RFK IDDRC scientific core use.  A description of the 6 scientific cores of the IDDRC can be found at http://einstein.yu.edu/centers/iddrc.
 

Submit your one-page LOI electronically as an e-mail attachment to rfk.iddrc@einstein.yu.edu on or before October 15, 2014.

Questions concerning this program should be directed to the RFK IDDRC Administrator, Lisa Guillory (lisa.guillory@einstein.yu.edu).

 

Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (RFK IDDRC) - NGEN Core Micro-Grants

FUNDS ARE AVAILABLE FOR INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES-RELATED RESEARCH PROJECTS 

The Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (RFK IDDRC) announces the availability of funds to support IDD-related research that involves use of the Neurogenomics core services. The RFK IDDRC administration will facilitate micro-grant funding to enable IDDRC basic, clinical and translational investigators to perform Neurogenomics studies. These funds may be used to enable new and established investigators 1) to generate preliminary data in order to successfully apply for extramural funding for their project or 2) to support or supplement ongoing IDD research programs.

Please visit the IDDRC website for information on services provided by the Neurogenomics core (http://einstein.yu.edu/centers/iddrc/research-cores/neurogenomics.aspx).  

The application submission deadline is January 17, 2014.  It is anticipated that funding will become available no later than February 1, 2014 ending on June 30, 2014. In some special cases funds may be used retroactively to support studies initiated after July 1, 2013. 

Decisions on funding will be made by the RFK IDDRC Executive Committee in consultation with the leadership of the Neurogenomics core.  

TO APPLY:

Complete the attached form that includes:
 

  • PI Name  
  • Title of the project 
  • Period of the project 
  • Proposed budget for NGEN core services 
  • Description of the project and current funding source (if any) 
  • Relevance to the mission of the IDDRC 
  • IRB and IACUC numbers and date of approval (if applicable) 

Any questions can be addressed to the IDDRC Administrator, Lisa Guillory (lisa.guillory@einstein.yu.edu).  

Please email a PDF file with the completed form and an NIH Biographical Sketch (including bibliography and other Research Support - include all active and pending support) to: rfk.iddrc@einstein.yu.edu.
 

 

Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (RFK IDDRC) Pilot and Feasibility Awards

The deadline for submission of a required, one-page letter of intent (LOI) has been extended to FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2013! 

FUNDS ARE AVAILABLE FOR INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES-RELATED RESEARCH PROJECTS 

The Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (RFK IDDRC) announces the availability of Pilot and Feasibility Awards (up to $35,000 annually) for both basic science and translational projects that involve intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs).  The awarded funds are intended to enable new and established investigators to generate preliminary data in order to successfully apply for extramural funding for their project.  Pilot and feasibility funds are not intended to support or supplement ongoing IDD research programs. Eligible applicants must hold the rank of instructor or higher at the time of the award.
 

ELIGIBILITY (in order of priority): This program is designed to support:

  1. New investigators with interests in IDD research. Meritorious applications from new investigators will receive priority for funding.
  2. Established faculty who wish to explore a new area of research involving IDDs that constitutes a substantive departure from their on-going work.
  3. Established faculty currently focused on IDD-related research who are attempting to build preliminary data for additional NIH grant support.

    Please note: It is not necessary to be an RFK IDDRC investigator or clinical partner at the time the application is submitted. 

APPLICATION
The deadline for submission of a required, one-page letter of intent (LOI) has been extended to NO LATER than FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2013, with full grant applications from the selected applicants due on November 15, 2013.  It is anticipated that funding for successful applicants will be initiated on January 1, 2014.  For the full application, a standard NIH R03 format is to be used.  A proposed pilot and feasibility study should present a testable hypothesis and clearly delineate the question being asked and why it is significant.  Details of the procedures to be followed and discussion of how the data will be analyzed should be provided.  

Submit your LOI electronically as an e-mail attachment to rfk.iddrc@einstein.yu.edu. Include an overview of your specific aims, a brief background for the research, and a proposed budget in your LOI.

BUDGET
The budget for the first year (of a possible two-year funding period) can be up to $35,000, though smaller budgets are recommended. Salary support for the investigator is generally not provided, except under circumstances that must be pre-approved before submission of the full grant.  It is anticipated that 25% of the grant budget will be used to cover costs of RFK IDDRC scientific core use. Renewal for a second year of funding is also a possibility contingent upon significant progress and ongoing need.  However, the program has a strong emphasis on the funding of new work, so we anticipate that the majority of awards in a given year will be to first-time applicants.  Recipients are required to submit a progress report after the first 9 months of funding.

No internal grant forms or approval signatures are necessary in order to submit an application. However, if CCI approval is needed for protection of human subjects or IACUC approval for animal studies, then applicants should apply for these approvals at the time the proposal is submitted.

Questions concerning this program should be directed to Lisa Guillory (lisa.guillory@einstein.yu.edu).

 

Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (RFK IDDRC) - NGEN Core Micro-Grants

FUNDS ARE AVAILABLE FOR INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES-RELATED RESEARCH PROJECTS 

The Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (RFK IDDRC) announces the availability of funds (for up to 10 projects for a $1,000 to $5,000 (maximum) award) to support IDD-related research that involves use of the Neurogenomics core services. The RFK IDDRC administration will facilitate micro-grant funding to enable IDDRC basic, clinical and translational investigators to perform Neurogenomics studies. These funds may be used to enable new and established investigators 1) to generate preliminary data in order to successfully apply for extramural funding for their project, or 2) to support or supplement ongoing IDD research programs.

Please visit the IDDRC website for information on services provided by the Neurogenomics core (http://einstein.yu.edu/centers/iddrc/research-cores/neurogenomics.aspx). 

The application submission deadline is January 11, 2013.  It is anticipated that funding will become available no later than February 1, 2013 ending on June 30, 2013. In some special cases funds may be used retroactively to support studies initiated after July 1, 2012. 

Decisions on funding will be made by the RFK IDDRC Executive Committee in consultation with the leadership of the Neurogenomics core.  

TO APPLY:

Complete the attached form that includes:
 

  • PI Name  
  • Title of the project 
  • Period of the project 
  • Proposed budget for NGEN core services 
  • Description of the project and current funding source (if any) 
  • Relevance to the mission of the IDDRC 
  • IRB and IACUC numbers and date of approval (if applicable) 

Any questions can be addressed to the IDDRC Administrator, Sukhi Lee (sukhi.lee@einstein.yu.edu).  

Please email a PDF file with the completed form and an NIH Biographical Sketch (including bibliography and other Research Support - include all active and pending support) to: rfk.iddrc@einstein.yu.edu.
 

 

Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (RFK IDDRC) Pilot and Feasibility Awards

FUNDS ARE AVAILABLE FOR INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES-RELATED RESEARCH PROJECTS 

The Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (RFK IDDRC) announces the availability of Pilot and Feasibility Awards (up to $35,000 annually) for both basic science and translational projects that involve intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs).  The awarded funds are intended to enable new and established investigators to generate preliminary data in order to successfully apply for extramural funding for their project.  Pilot and feasibility funds are not intended to support or supplement ongoing IDD research programs. Eligible applicants must hold the rank of instructor or higher at the time of the award.
 

ELIGIBILITY (in order of priority): This program is designed to support:

  1. New investigators with interests in IDD research. Meritorious applications from new investigators will receive priority for funding.
  2. Established faculty who wish to explore a new area of research involving IDDs that constitutes a substantive departure from their on-going work.
  3. Established faculty currently focused on IDD-related research who are attempting to build preliminary data for additional NIH grant support.

    Please note: It is not necessary to be an RFK IDDRC investigator or clinical partner at the time the application is submitted. 

APPLICATION
A one-page letter of intent (LOI) is required by September 28, 2012, with full grant applications from the selected applicants due on November 9, 2012.  It is anticipated that funding for successful applicants will be initiated on January 1, 2013.  For the full application, a standard NIH R03 format is to be used.  A proposed pilot and feasibility study should present a testable hypothesis and clearly delineate the question being asked and why it is significant.  Details of the procedures to be followed and discussion of how the data will be analyzed should be provided.  

Submit your LOI electronically as an e-mail attachment to rfk.iddrc@einstein.yu.edu. Include an overview of your specific aims, a brief background for the research, and a proposed budget in your LOI.

BUDGET
The budget for the first year (of a possible two-year funding period) can be up to $35,000, though smaller budgets are recommended. Salary support for the investigator is generally not provided, except under circumstances that must be pre-approved before submission of the full grant.  It is anticipated that 25% of the grant budget will be used to cover costs of RFK IDDRC scientific core use. Renewal for a second year of funding is also a possibility contingent upon significant progress and ongoing need.  However, the program has a strong emphasis on the funding of new work, so we anticipate that the majority of awards in a given year will be to first-time applicants.  Recipients are required to submit a progress report after the first 9 months of funding.

No internal grant forms or approval signatures are necessary in order to submit an application. However, if CCI approval is needed for protection of human subjects or IACUC approval for animal studies, then applicants should apply for these approvals at the time the proposal is submitted.

Questions concerning this program should be directed to Sukhi Lee (sukhi.lee@einstein.yu.edu).

 

MR-Based Research Using the MRRC Core Facilities

The Gruss Magnetic Resonance Research Facility announces the availability of Pilot and Feasibility Funds (two awards of $8,400 each for human research utilizing the 3.0 Tesla Philips MRI/MRS, and three awards of $5,400 each utilizing the 9.4 Tesla Agilent MRI/MRS) for new projects which will utilize the Gruss MRRC MRI facilities. The specific instrumentation and expertise available within the Center may be found at:http://www.einstein.yu.edu/centers/gruss-magnetic-resonance-research. These funds are intended to enable investigators to generate preliminary data to provide the basis for seeking extramural funding. Researchers are encouraged to use this opportunity to establish collaborative interactions with the Core Facility team of scientists. Future funding can then support long-term collaborations utilizing the core facilities. The deadline for this application is December 1, 2012. For more information visit: http://www.einstein.yu.edu/research/pilot-grants/pilot-grant.asp?PGID=21     

 

NeuroAIDS/Neuro Markers-Related Pilot Projects

The Center for AIDS Research is seeking applications for pilot grants from Einstein and Montefiore faculty directed at stimulating the development of Neuro Markers to predict and follow the course of NeuroAIDS, particularly through projects partnering members of the CFAR with RFK IDDRC investigators. Awards up to $25,000 for 1 year will be made on the basis of competitive applications. Applications must demonstrate a clear description of the prospects for the development of a subsequent grant application.The project must include substantial work in human subjects, populations, or human-derived material(s). The deadline for this application is October 15, 2012. For more information visit: http://www.einstein.yu.edu/research/pilot-grants/pilot-grant.asp?PGID=18  

 

Neuropathology Training Grant

We are pleased to announce that the Neuropathology training Grant has been renewed as of July 1, 2011. This grant will support the training of predoctoral (1) and postdoctoral fellows (4) with state-of the-art molecular approaches to disease-based neuropathology. The program is run by an 18 member, highly interactive training faculty with independent research funding and a long history of collaboration. The Program embraces colleagues in the Depts. of Pathology, Neuroscience, Developmental Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, Microbiology and Immunology and Genetics, with a particular focus on research into the pathogenesis of brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Multiple Sclerosis, NeuroAIDS, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s Diseases. Trainees (who are required to be US citizens or Green Card holders) will use cutting-edge molecular, proteomic, structural, genetic and clinical approaches to investigate questions of fundamental importance to neurological disease. Contact the RFK IDDRC office, or the grant’s PI (Laura Santambrogio M.D. Ph.D in the Department of Pathology) for further information.

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